Slotmachineclub.com

HomeContact UsState LawsLibraryClubsEventsLinksSerial Numbers

This page may be a little lengthy; I included descriptions in a effort to help clarify what is in each volume, comments on format are welcome.  Please send them to bmarti@slotmachineclub.com.  Please note that I have put in place holders for issues I don't have, please scroll through the page to see the information I do have for you.  If you have access to these issues and would like to provide information, please email them to me.

 

The Coin Slot Magazines had all advertisers listed conveniently in the front of most of their publications.  I found this to be an interesting feature.  I did not add this information because after 20 years I don't really know how many of this businesses still exist.

 

Another unique feature of this publication was a Collectors' Directory which was free to subscribers to the magazine. The directory listed the collectors by name, address and their interests. Unfortunately, it is not included in every issue.

 

The Coin Slot

Month

Year

Issue

Features

September 1974 #1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COVER

On this month's cover, the opposite page, and in the centerfold, we have reprinted an ad that was put out by the Viking Specialty Company, San Francisco, California, during the late 1930's.  they carried a complete line of coin-op equipment, ranging from slots, gumballs, and stamp machines, to units that vended prophylactics, matches, handkerchiefs, and even scales and pay toilet locks.  For these pictures we are much indebted to Gordon and Frances Bousfield of Arrow Enterprises P.O. Box 81272, San Diego, Cal. 92138.

 

 

EDITORIAL

Getting out the first issue of a newsletter is quite challenging, especially when it is on a subject that has never been covered before; at least as far as we know.  This task is further complicated by the fact that neither Edith nor I have ever edited anything before.  However, with a great deal of help from people all over the country we have managed to get out this first issue.  We hope it gives you as much pleasure as it gave us satisfaction in preparing it.

October

1974

#2

COVER

On this months cover is a photo of the Edison ECLIPSE coin operated phonograph, forerunner of the modern juke box. This is a particularly rare and desirable machine. It dates from 1906, and originally cost $65, F.O.B.

 

 

CENTERFOLD

In the center of this months issue is a reproduction of an ad for the huge Mills upright slot machines, circa 1901.  At additional cost these machines were available with a music box attachment that played a tune each time the handle was pulled. This was done to circumvent the antigambling laws, the theory being that the customer was actually paying for entertainment, and the gambling was incidental.

 

EDISON COIN-SLOT PHONOGRAPHS

Regardless of the field of collecting, all antique collectors do have at least one trait in common: we want to know when, where, and by whom our treasured objects were made.  The original cost is another factor that usually intrigues us. Since most of the items we seek were constructed after 1850, this task is not an impossible one, and is often aided by looking through old catalogues. The reprints of the old Sears and Montgomery-Ward books are often very useful for this purpose.

 

THOMAS A. EDISON

This photograph of Edison, age 30, was taken on April 18, 1878, in the studio of Mathew Brady, 627 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Washington D. C. Beside Mr. Edison is one of his very first working models of the phonograph.

November

1974

#3

COVER

Watling Slot Machines, Circa 1910.  The illustrations on this month's cover and center pages are reproductions of ads printed by the Watling Scale Co, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1910. We are able to print them by the courtesy of Mr. Russell, 2404 W. l1lth St., Chicago, Ill. 60655, who was kind enough to lend us the originals.

 

 

BOOK REVIEW -  Irv. Scott Wolf

GAMBLING AND GAMBLING DEVICES, by John Philip Quinn.  Originally published in 1912. Reprinted 1969. Hard cover. 308 pages. Available from John W. Caler Publications, 7506 Clybourn Ave, Sun Valley, Calif. 91352. $15 postpaid.

 

 

INTERESTED IN ANTIQUE PHONOS?

Why not subscribe to THE ANTIQUE PHONOGRAPH MONTHLY? For a free brochure and list of other antique phonograph publications, send two stamps to: Allen Koenigsberg - Editor 3400 Snyder Ave, Brooklyn, N. Y. 11203.

December

1974

#4

This is the fourth issue of The Coin Slot, and we are very pleased with its progress.  We are proud to announce that Mr. Richard Bueschel, author of Lemons! Cherries! and Bell-Fruit-Gum (a book about the history of slots, soon to be released by Vestal Press), has agreed to contribute several articles, and illustrations, one of which is on this month' s cover, which is described below The center pages of this month's issue feature both sides of a fold -up postcard ad sent out by the Watling Manufacturing Co, in 1903.  It was submitted by Stephen Leonard, 60E. 12 St., Apt. 6E, N.Y.C., N. Y. 10003

 

COVER

This Month's Cover, by Richard M. Bueschel.  It wasn't until after the turn of the century that Art and Adolph Caille were able to  assemble enough hard cash to buyout their various backers, but when they did they collected all of the machines they had produced under various names and put them under one banner.

 

 

AT AUCTION

As most clock collectors know, auctions these days generally offer few clocks, and of those available, even fewer are truly desirable itemsSince horological items have of late become in the vogue with decorators and investors, horologists will testify to the fact that most of these items have been priced way above the means of the average collector.  The sale held on Oct. 19th , at the Northern Westchester Auction Galleries, in Yorktown, N.Y. was a pleasant two fold contradiction to the above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOOK REVIEW, by Irv. Scott Wolf

INVESTMENTS IN HISTORY, by Art Durbin. 34 pages, paper back. Available from the publisher , Art Durbin, A&M Sales, 1801 College Ave., Manhattan, Ks. 66502. $3.25 postpaid. In his book, Investments In History, Art Durbin gives the novice collector of things horological a taste of what it is all about. Watch collecting is a multifaceted avocation, and as anyone in the field will testify, to write an all encompassing treatise on the subject would indeed be a Herculean task that would require hundreds of volumes.

January

1975

#5

LISTS

As every collector knows, from perusing all the antique publications, there are hundreds of people who offer lists of items for sale. Some charge for their lists, some don't, and some will credit the cost of the list against a purchase.  Personally, I don't see anything wrong with a dealer asking a small fee for a list, since this discourages the people who just collect lists, but never buy anything. Unfortunately, many of these lists are largely illegible, ill printed, and only vaguely descriptive of the merchandise.

 

 

 

COWPER

One of the aims we had when we started The Coin Slot was to help fellow collectors repair and identify machines they were having trouble with.  Recently we got a letter from Dick Zeller of Troy, NY, who wrote that he had bought a machine, the likes of which he had never seen before.  It was not in working condition, and Dick did not know where to begin the job of restoration, or even who originally made the item. The picture that Dick sent along with his letter was something that we, too, could not identify, so we forwarded it to a real expert, Dick Bueschel, of Chicago, author of Lemons, Cherries & Bell-Fruit-Gum. There probably isn't a slot machine made that Dick Bueschel doesn't know about, and we felt confident that he could solve the mystery.  Sure enough, Dick B. replied that the machine was either a Cowper, or a Berger (he couldn't tell from the photo, but he felt sure that it was a Cowper), both made in Chicago before the turn of the Century, and both machines electrically run. According to Dick B., both machines had a very short life, as the Dewey, and the Owl virtually knocked them off the market.

 

 

 

 

WATCHES

As a watch collector who is often in contact with others of the same affectation, I find that most of us are usually glad to show off our accumulations.  The problem is, that while there is no shortage of Elgin and Walthams, few of us have more than one or two really fine pieces, if even that many.  And with inflation being what it is today, few individuals can afford the Breguets, Pateks, and Vacherons.

December

1975

#14

What is the rarest ROL-A-TOP? - Richard M. Bueschel

One of the reasons the Watling ROL-A-TOR and ROL-A-TOP machines are so popular is the fact that they have population: there are enough of them around to make collectors and basement game-room enthusiasts familiar with the machines. Add the fact that they have great "flash," or playable appearance, and the result is a classic.

Watling Creates New Name and New Machine

ROL-A-TOR is Latest Development in Bell Constructions - The Coin Machine Journal  December 1934

When we made our regular visit this month to the plant of the Watling Manufacturing Company we saw signs of an unusual rush for this season of the year for any manufacturer. We thought here was a story. The Watling plant is always busy but never was it busier.  So, we asked John Watling, general manager and the man behind the guns, to give us a story.

January 1976 #15

COVER

LIBERTY BELL SLOT, 1895, Chas. Fey & Co.

 

FEATURES

The Bell Slot -Marshall A. Fey

Payout Slide Adjustment - John Reely

Maintenance Tips

Glues, Loading Equipment, Lubricants, Turntables, Headband magnifier, Screwdriver, How to drill out a Mills lock, cotter keys, cleaning spray paint heads, and Leather lubricant.

June

1976

#17

COVER

Victorian Casino Auction, May 1976

 

FEATURES

Mills Bonus Bell - Les Druyan

 

July

1976

#18

COVER

Pictured on the cover is the Mills CHECK-BOY, one of the counter top one-reelers. Bob Rosenberg discusses in this month's Current Scene column.

Editor's Statement

Please help me these first few issues by not becoming impatient over the slow delivery of your Coin Slot.  I am trying to find the fastest and surest means possible of getting your issue to you.  I welcome all suggestions, ads, articles and anything that would help make your magazine better.

Thirty Years Of Undeclared War: The slot machine player vs. the manufacturer/operator - Robert L. Frankenberger, Ph.D.

Whenever man invents a machine, game, or system designed to separate a man from his money, whether it is cards, horses or a pea under a walnut shell, some other man will find a way to beat the system.  Slot machines are no exception.  I suppose when the first slot machines appeared in large numbers players discovered ways to get an edge. As soon as this discovery became apparent to the manufacturers, they in turn secured the machine against the technique.  This tug of war by both the manufacturer/operator and players see-sawed back and forth for thirty years.

Current Scene- Bob Rosenberger

Cast iron one-reelers are one of the least known of the old counter -top gambling machines.  These pay-out machines were manufactured largely between 1900 and 1915: they are considered to be the transitional link between the earlier developed pinwheel uprights and five-reel poker machines and the later three-reel slot machines.  The cast iron one-reelers are characterized by their single revolving reel containing different symbols along with a cash or token payout.  While Mills and Caille were the principal one-reel manufacturers, smaller manufacturers such as Paupa and Hochreim of Chicago also produced models.

Coming Soon!

Questions & Answers - Mr. Richard M. Bueschel

Well known authority on mechanical gambling and amusement machines, and author of forthcoming book, Lemons, Cherries & Bell Fruit Gum, has consented to write a question and answer column for The Coin Slot.

April

1977

#27

COVER

The cover of this month's issue is self-explanatory! - Watling Mfg. Co. ROL-A-TOR

Editor's Statement

I am planning on a real big Coin Slot in June for the first anniversary of my ownership. There will be a lot of extra copies circulated in June, so if you want to get in this issue, May 15th will be the deadline for June.

Bubble Gum Machines - David G. Bassitt

I now hope that the bubblegum craze has put the bite on you.  Whether you would like to collect bubblegum machines as a hobby, for resale, or would just like to own one machine for the fun of it; please remember there are important items you should consider.

Current Scene- Bob Rosenberger

I'm on the horns of a dilemma.  The California law legalizing the possession of slot machines by collectors has caused the market there to go absolutely haywire.  And the shock waves have been felt throughout the country. Remember the $300 slot machine?  Well, those days are over! Unless you are lucky enough to have unenlightened sources of supply, prices have skyrocketed.  An ordinary 3-reeler like a Mills Cherry Bell now costs around $450.00 to $600.00 and the more desirable ROL-A-TOPs, TREASURYs. WAR EAGLEs, etc., cost considerably ,more.  It's like a study of the basic free enterprise system: when a large number of buyers compete for a limited number of items, prices go up. And unless a local collector is willing to pay California prices, the machines will invariably wind up in California.

It's Like This - The Story Of George Kern - John Barron, feature writer, LASALLE-PERU DAILY NEWS-TRIBUNE

Editor's Note:

When Dick Bueschel was researching trade stimulators for his book LEMONS, CHERRIES AND BELL-FRUIT-GUM (hopefully to be published later this year by Vestal Press) he ran across two patents for an interesting pair of mechanical games with unique mechanism characteristics.  They were very complicated, but both were obviously "Cigar Machines" for counter payouts.  They were patented by a man named George Kern in Peru, Illinois.  Unable to find out anything about them in trade channels, and having never seen the actual machines, Dick contacted Ken Hansen, librarian of the Peru Public Library.  Hansen in turn contacted John Barron, a well-known historical researcher and feature writer on the LaSalle-Peru Daily News- Tribune.  Barron got interested in the story and dug further, with surprising results. The story ran in the "It's Like This ... " column in the paper on January 3rd and 4th of this year.  Dick asked for permission to have the columns reprinted in The Coin Slot, and John Barron replied that "we are delighted to have you reprint them."  Both columns follow. But the question still remains.  Did the machines ever get produced, and if so, where are they?

Oregon Legislative Assembly - 1977 Regular Session: House Bill 2652

Sponsored by Representative KULONGOSKI (at the request of Arlene's General Store, Elkton, Oregon) SUMMARY: The following summary is not prepared by the sponsors of the measure and is not a part of the body thereof subject to consideration by the Legislative Assembly.  It is an editor's brief statement of the essential features of the measure as introduced.

May

1978

#40

COVER

A Pinball Game from the past with a price from the past - See the article on pinball machines by John Fetterman and Steve Young.

Editor's Statement

The next issue after this will make the 2nd anniversary of my ownership of The Coin Slot . . I wish to thank all of you who have supported and encouraged me.

About Pinball - John Fetterman and Steve Young

The other day I went to play pinball at a local university.  I was treated to several brand-new games with brand-new problems, several very old games had seen their last good games before needing a major overhaul years ago, and a host of recent games in horrendous shape.  They had a host of problems - some out of order entirely, others limping along with one or two weak flippers, broken contacts; some sat lopsided and all were saddled with free play scores much too high for even a game in mint condition.  I hopped from game to game hoping to find an enjoyable time somewhere, but finally gave up and left for home.  I mentally tallied up how much I had spent and, surely enough, I spent much more than I would have had the games given me a reasonable chance to win replays.  This would make the operator happy. But I also made a mental note not to return again, more than I'd wished, not just that I had suffered the disappointment of not being able to playa satisfying game of pinball all night - and it seems to happen to pinball more and more these days - the problem was that the person operating those games is shortchanging an art.

Royal Casino Antiques - Proudly announces the first public offering of our beautifully carved Western characters ...

Up until now, these figures could only be found in the leading casinos throughout Nevada.  Only a handful ever reached any of the private collectors.  Now they are being created for the enjoyment of all in the likeness of many popular figures from the pages of Western History.  Miners, cowboys, and everyone's favorite, "the One-Armed Bandit" are some of our offerings.  Although they share some similarities, no two figures will ever be exactly alike, thus assuring you a one-of-a-kind figure.  In addition, we will custom make any figure to your specifications.  We are only limited by your imagination.  If you can imagine it, we can turn your dream into a reality!

"FORTUNE" Reel Strips

Contact: D. B. Evan., 7999 Keller Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio

Price: $15.00 per set, four sets for $50.00. Large 18x26" press sheet of all four sets, $40.00, special prices in quantities.

Rick Frink of Howell, Michigan and Dave Evans of Cincinnati feel they have solved another problem for slot machine restorers - some first class fortune reel strips.  All collectors have smiled at the humorous gems of wit on these strips - such as "You'll fall in love - with a wealthy old maid - with a shiny bald head" but they lamented the poor condition of these forty year old strips.  Now, you can replace those dim, darkened strips with brand new ones that match the originals.

An excerpt from "The 100 Most Popular Collectible Slot Machines" - Mr. Richard M. Bueschel.

Mills SILENT GOOSENECK Bell Machine - Produced between 1931 and 1936

There's more confusion over the age, actual name and nicknames of this popular early-thirties Bell than any other machine in its class.  Mills Novelty Company didn't help the situation much because they never really had a clear place in their line for this machine.  We should say "machines", because the model variations are all over the map.  Actually, the machine was a mop-up form at as you'll see.

The Mills CHERRY BELL and VENDER - Richard M. Bueschel

What do you do when you've got a hot line of bell machines and your distributors keep asking for something new?  That was the problem that continually faced the Mills Novelty Company in the "Golden Age" of slot machines:  the 1930's. Once the mighty Mills Novelty Company had broken the bonds of bell machine design with the pace-setting Mills SILENT of 1931 (also called the "WAR EAGLE" or "YELLOW FRONT") the clamor for "something new" was unending.  It was an age of conspicuous consumption that demanded new ideas and new models.  The concept of the annual model change took over the automotive industry . .. and also slot machines.

May

1979

#51

COVER

This one of a kind Berger offered for sale by Royal Casino Antiques

Editor's Statement

We did it - 10,000 copies of the Coin Slot have been mailed.  I would like to thank all those people who worked so hard to get it out and also those who advertised in this special issue.

Letters to the Editor

A Safari in Search of the White Elephant - Robert L. Frankenberger, PH.D.

There it sit...in the family room between the Dewey and the digger.  As big and as square as a chest type freezer.  It looks like a cubic yard of dirty snow.  My wife hates it.  My friends laugh at it.  Even I am beginning to lose affection for it.  it is developing a malevolent personality of its own.  It snarls instead of hums.  It clanks and clatters like a disposal full of hammers.  What am I going to do with this thing?  By now you should have guessed that the thing is the famous 25 cent Roulette, WHITE ELEPHANT.

About Pinball - John Fetterman

(This is the second part of a series covering pinball playfield targets.  Last month's part one covered two categories of targets; those which change the ball's direction and those which physically retain the ball.  Area-sensitive targets and targets which move are this month's study objects.)

 

The area-sensitive targets are theoretically passive targets; the ball's being in the target's area should be sufficient to register the target.

Machine No. 9 - The Coin Slot "Most Wanted" List - Dick Bueschel

 

Manufacturer: William C. Jones Machine Shop

Location: Niantic, Illinois

Machine Name: AUTOMATIC WIZARD CLOCK

Date Introduced: 1903

 

About two years ago a guy named Stan Krongold did an interesting article about a coin operated machine for one of the clock collector publications.  The subject was "An Uncommon Black Mantel Clock," and in his article he described what he learned about the origin of the token vender mantel clocks that clock collectors have wondered about for some time.

About Pinball - Steve Young

A Primer on Magnet Coils and Solenoid Coils - Part 5: Replacing Gottlieb Pinball Coils

Book Review For:

"An Illustrated Price Guide To the 100 Most Collectible Slot Machines - Vol.2" by Richard M. Bueschel, Publishers - The Coin Slot, Box 612, Wheatridge, Co., 80033, 150pp.

Serial No. Clearing House - Dick Bueschel

Most clot machine collectors are delighted and amazed at the large collections amassed by some of the early collectors, and are sometimes jaded by the rooms full of machines they see in person or in print.  The fact of the matter is that most collector's don't have a room full of machines.  The majority of collectors have three or four machines, backed up by a growing number of one machine collectors that will be the large collectors of the future.

July

1980

#65

COVER

This month we have a "Wheel of Fortune" which is a collage of pictures from The Antique Gambler's Las Vegas auction.  The focal point is Roy Bunch.

Editor's Statement -Rosanna Harris

The June issue was a challenge, but such a great adventure.  We feel that it was a tremendous boost and we find that you are in agreement with us.  The comments have started reaching us about the full size issue.  Most are very complimentary and some are constructively critical.  One comment-the pictures. You're correct; they were not good.  Our photographer did not do an excellent job, but we guarantee we're out there trying and even the pictures will improve.  One final note on that point, the pictures used in conjunction with the letters to the editor are generally color photographs and they do not print well.  We will continue to use them, but we would prefer black and white.

Letters to the Editor

Las Vegas Auction

Roy Bunch of The Antique Gambler brought together an outstanding array of machines and associated gambling items for the auction held May 17 and 18.  The auction was not held among the glitter of the gambling halls, but in The Antique Gambler's building off the "Strip."  The two day auction was very well attended by people from throughout the United States and we even took note of representatives from Japan.

Coin Slot Guides - Richard M. Busechel

Overview of the first 20 Coin Slot Guides

The following excerpts are from "The 100 Most Collectible Slot Machines" Volume I and Volume II. They were some of the featured machines at the Las Vegas auction and are being reprinted as a source of background for those of you who may not possess copies of Dick Bueschel's books.

Watling ROL-A-TOP Bell Machine: Produced between 1935 and 1946 - Dick Bueschel

From Volume I - The Watling ROL-A-TOP rates as the "most wanted" three-reel machine by a majority of collectors.  The reason is that it is so flashy, as well as mechanically fascinating.  Fortunately, there are wads of these machines around.  The ROL-A-TOP isn't really just a machine; it's a full line.  Over the years well over thirty different models were produced.  It's the circular escalator that makes these machines so desirable.

Mills TWENTIETH CENTURY Floor Wheel: Produced between 1900 and 1916 - Dick Bueschel

The TWENTIETH CENTURY (the nameplate says 20TH CENTURY, but it was often cataloged as the TWENTIETH CENTURY) was the Mills answer to the 8-way machines introduced by Caille-Schiemer and The Automatic Machine And Tool Company.  It was obviously the most successful as there's only one or two of the others still around.  While not numbered high, there are quite a number of TWENTIETH CENTURY machines in collections, and they seem to pop up.  Oddly, practically everyone is different suggestion a high proliferation of models or custom construction of each one.

Most Wanted List - Dick Bueschel

Caille Bros. was all but out of the ball game.  They also made outboard motors, but the depression stopped those sales. Adolph Callie, the surviving Caille brother (his cofounding brother Art Caille had died in 1917), sold out and The Caille Bros. Co. continued under new management.  Callie Bell machines and outboard motors were still being made, but not by Cailles'.

The Famous "1 2 3" Vender - Dave Bassitt

This machine is called by a number of different names.  To the best of my knowledge this is a LEEBOLD and was manufactured by the R.D. Simpson Company in Columbus, Ohio.  If you have this machine in your collection you should have a marquee on the top of the machine as is shown in the photo and it reads: (LOOK, 8 BALLS, 3 CENTS).  The decal is very early and is classified as a paper decal.  Needless to say this is a very unusual machine.  This machine dates back to the very early 1920's.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

When you get to playing the numbers game, as we do with the serial number update, you begin to see relationships between machines that aren't self evident at first, but stand out like sore thumbs once you begin to compare things.  This month's listings have a good example or two.

Legalization Map

29 STATES HAVE PASSED LAWS WITH REFERENCE TO OWNING SLOT MACHINES.  KEEP US UP TO DATE ON YOUR STATE.  LET US HELP YOU.  LET OUR READERS HELP.  SEND US CURRENT INFORMATION.  IOWA IS LEGAL AS OF JULY 1, 1980.  MR. RICH PENN HAS KEPT US WELL INFORMED AS YOU CAN SEE ON THE FOLLOWING PAGE.  IOWANS - BREAK OUT THE MACHINES AND CELEBRATE!!!  The map Is filling In quickly.  Don't let your state be the last one to fill In.

Color Iowa Black

To the Editor,

Finally!!!  You can color Iowa Black!  Here's a copy of the Bill Governor Ray signed to legalize collecting antique slots in Iowa.   It goes into effect July First.

Service Guide

Buyer's Guide

For Sale

Want Ads

 

September

1981

#79

COVER

Arcade Magic is the first installment of a monthly column by Steve Gronowski about the fascinating arcade machines which captured hours of youngsters' time in the thirties, forties and fifties.  Today those same youngsters' (now grown up) time as the machines have become part of the growing collectibles.  Steve leads us into the world of arcade to explore with him the "magic" of such machines as the ELECTRIC ENERGIZER, THE WHOM TO MARRY MACHINE, THE ORACLE FORTUNE TELLERS, THE GOLD MINE, THE LOVE TESTER and many more.

Letters to the Editor

Editor's Statement

It is too easy to let important things go unsaid.  Our task - labor of love - would be fruitless if it were not for all of the individuals involved in The Coin Slot.  Our readers are a marvelous group, but they would diminish without the vital input of our contributing authors.  There are many who fill the ranks either on an occasional basis or on a monthly schedule.

Arcade Magic - Steve Gronowski

In our monthly column, "Arcade Magic", we are going to examine one example of an arcade machine which worked the magic of removing pennies and nickels from the hands of enjoyment seekers and depositing them in the operators' pockets.

The Name's the Game - Russ Jensen

One of my personal pet peeves as a pinball collector and historian is when I answer an ad in a newspaper for a pinball for sale and ask the owner for the name of the game.  In most cases they will either reply "What do you mean?" or, after going to look at the machine come back with something like "Williams Electronics, CHICAGO".  In other cases I have talked to people who have owned a machine for a year or so and when I asked them the name of their game they do not know, even though they have been staring at the backboard for over a year!!!  To me the name is the game's identity, which separates it from any other game, just as a person's name is his identity.  For this reason I am devoting this article to pinball names including much trivia concerning them.

Master No. 77 - Dave Bassitt

The Master Machines are quality machines and very collectible.  The company spared neither time nor expense during 1923 in developing and perfecting the greatest merchandise venders ever built.

Hints on Restoration and Repair - Marc Harrison

TIMING and RUN-OUT: Timing - the sequential occurrence of events during run-out - is a function whose importance cannot be over emphasized.  Proper timing is often difficult to achieve as it is influenced by so many components and linkages acting both independently and conjunctively.  The action of these parts can be divided into five distinctly separate events; the independent stopping of the first, second, and third reels; the release of the payout fingers; and finally the release of the payout slides.  Failure of any of these events to occur at the precisely correct moment during run-out, or occurrence out of sequence, will render even the most beautiful machine unplayable.

Put Another Nickel In -  Art Reblltz

THE SEEBURG STYLE L - Part 1:  The subject of this month's feature was one of the best selling coin pianos of all time; several hundred extant examples make it one of the most abundant and popular music machines among collectors.  At any given time, an example can usually be found for sale if a diligent search is made.  It is relatively simple, compact and durable, and it produces an excellent variety of lively music.

Geyer Absolute Auction - Walt Delle

Sunday, July 19, 1981 was a hot and sweltering day in Skippack, PA, where an overflowing crowd of more than 400 gathered for an auction conducted at the local Fire House.  The auction consisted of firearms, jewelry, a few gumball machines, pinball machines, a few trade stimulators, juke boxes and slot machines.  The spotlight of the auction was shared by two exquisite excellent items.  One, a Mills OWL upright slot machine which had been restored to like new condition, except for a slight bend in the rotating disc. The exterior was a perfect restoration.  As in the past, auctions conducted in this area were done so without the benefit of internal inspection of the machines.   This fine example brought the high bid of the day at $6,800.  The other outstanding item was a 1936 Wurlitzer Model 1 015 " BUBBLE TUBE" Juke Box which was restored both inside and outside to a perfect condition. Local experts placed a value of $6,000 on this beautiful bargain which came complete with a set of rock & roll records. With records playing, bubbles bubbling and multi-color lights enticing enthusiastic bidders, this outstanding machine brought a high bid of $5,000, said by many to be the best buy of the day. It should be noted that all bids have a 10% buyers fee added, therefore the lucky buyers had to pay $7,480 for the Mills OWL and $5,500 for the Wurlitzer 1015. Prices given for the following machines have the 10% added to them. The condition given for each machine is for their appearance only as an internal inspection was not permitted.

List of Advertisers

6: Amusement Sales Co.

38: Antique Amusements

38: Bernie Berten

2: Chicago Antique Slot Machine Co.

10: Coin Op Amusement

37: Doml Racer

43: Dave Evans

47: Bill Harris

48: Home Amusement Co.

44: Jukebox Jim

32: Jukebox Junction

12: Meekins Music Box Co.

11: Metropolitan Advertising Show

23: National Antique Promotions

45: Post-Era Books

35: Royal Casino Antiques

5: St. Louis Slot Machine Co.

7: Wagon Wheel Auctions

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

'Sir' Arthur Burrows and the Burrows Automatic Supply Company: 'The games at the place attracted the youths of Brighton who acquired and developed there a taste for gambling and wasting money which might very well be applied to other purposes.  It was a lure for idlers and a temptation for young children.  Soldiers and civilians congregated on the premises which were opened in the evening and kept open very late.  The whole atmosphere of the place was prejudicial to public morals and policing .. .'  So ran the case for the prosecution in an action against the proprietor of the Sports Arcade, Brighton, in 1917.  The 'svengali' behind this 'evil' operation was none other than Arthur Burrows, founder of the Burrows Automatic Supply Company and one of the most colorful characters in the history of the English automatics industry.

The Token Corner - Stephen P. Alpert

SOME EARLY BRITISH SLOT MACHINE TOKENS: In the July issue of The Coin Slot, Nic Costa tells the story of Jack Holloway and his Samson Novelty Company in Great Britain.  Fortunately, the Samson Novelty Company also issued several different brass tokens for use in their slot machines.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

A little of this and a little of that, and a lesson in humility.  That's what we have in the Serial Number Update this month.

Jukebox Fever -  Jim McLellan

If you ever drank a green river, or used the expressions lalapaloser or swell, or heard Harry Truman on the radio, or actually sat in a room and had a conversation with someone because T. V. wasn't available as yet, then maybe you remember advertisements in Collier's, Look, Liberty, True Confessions, and the Saturday Evening Post depicting happy folks gathered around a jukebox.

Coming Events

Slot Machines As An Investment - Richard D. Reddock

Is the U.S. dollar dead??  One might think so.  As inflation has climbed over the last few years, predictions of economic disaster and hyperinflation just around the corner, some people have turned away from paper money and into investments long considered the domains of hobbyists and millionaires.  This "gloom and doom" philosophy of paper money may soon become worthless, so investing in "things" that will keep their value.  Some "things" people may be looking to invest in are gold and silver coins, stamps, real estate, gas and oil, strategic metals, rare books, stocks and bonds and antiques and collectibles.  However, there is certainly no guarantee that you will make money in any of these investments.

The Coin Slot Coin-Op Contest

As announced in the August issue of The Coin Slot, we are sponsoring a contest on coin-op machines which will test your knowledge about specific machines in relation to mechanical details,  nickname trivia and related information.  The contest is restricted to paid subscribers of The Coin Slot. Contributing authors or employees of The Coin Slot are not eligible to participate.

Legislative Map

LOUISIANA is, in fact, number 34!  The Governor signed the bill July 23, 1981.  Congratulations to all of you who worked so diligently on the new law.  You proved it can be done.  We have received an interesting piece of information from Kentucky.  This may be a good time to get some legislation moving.

Louisiana Legislation

Dear Editor.

It finally happened, Louisiana is now legal.  On Thursday, July 23, 1981, Governor Dave Treen signed H.B. #1216 to make it Act 783 of the 1981 Legislature.  It was an uphill battle all the way. I spent 21 days in Baton Rouge lobbying this bill.  There is a lot more I will have to say in the future, but at this time I will just say we are happy.  Enclosed is a copy of the bill as it passed.  If anyone has any questions, please feel free to drop me a line.

Anthony J. Schneller

% Automatic Coin Enterprise, Inc.

112 Spar Street

Metairie, Louisiana 70001

Sincerely,

Anthony J. Schneller

HLC 81-1734

Regular SeSSion, 1981

HOUSE BILL NO. 1216

BY MR. CAIN

Slot Machine Smuggling - ED ANDERSON

Federal authorities Thursday were investigating a New Orleans man for allegedly smuggling 33 slot machines described as "sewing machine parts" on import documents from England to Louisiana.

Book Review - Dave Evans

WALLACE·HOMESTEAD PRICE GUIDE TO ANTIQUE SLOT MACHINES, by Richard and Barbara Reddock, published by Wallace-Homestead Publishing Co., Des Moines, Iowa 296 pages, sticker price $12.95, available thru COIN SLOT BOOKS at sticker price plus postage.

Richard Reddock has been collecting slots for less than two years, yet he was able to do enough research; get help from enough collectors, that he could author a very creditable book on the hobby.  My first thought is that this type of feat requires more guts than good sense, but it shows what can be done if you put your mind to it - have a helpful and co-operative wife, and a wide circle of friends to lend a hand!  Author Reddock starts the book with a dedication to his wife (although she appears as co-author) that should really hit home to all of us who at times might not appreciate our very tolerant wives.

Classified Ads

January

1982

#83

COVER

Jean-Claude Boudot has over 150 machines from his collection on display in the "International Slot Machine Museum" in Paris.  His favorite is "Les Guguss."  It is nearly an unknown machine, but in the article by Nic Costa we find out what it is and how it works.  Before reading the article, try to guess how the machine works.

 

INSIDE

Letters To The Editor

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

Recently one of our readers from across the sea wrote to us asking why we placed so much emphasis on American slot machines and the laws of our individual states.  He validly pointed out that this is not especially interesting to our foreign readers.  We certainly agree with the points he made, but we would like to share our thoughts with you as it may explain some of the reasoning behind what we are doing with The Coin Slot.

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

More puzzling tokens

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

 

The Las Vegas Museum in Paris - In the early 1960's a young conscript in the French army happened to be passing a junk shop.  He paused a while and noticed in an odd corner, half obscured by the articles around it, an old coin operated machine.  he had long been toying with the idea of buying such a device, merely to amuse himself, as a memento perhaps of childhood days.

The International Slot Machine Museum

The International Slot Machine Museum has opened its doors in the heart of Paris a few yards from the Pompidou Center.

Special Treat For Slot Collectors In Paris

Travelers to Paris this Autumn have an usual treat awaiting them just a few short blocks from the Pompidou Center.

Jean-Claude Baudot is on of a handful of French collectors of antique coin operated machines.  What makes his collection of over 150 internationally made slot machines, trade stimulators, and penny arcade machines unique is not only the rareness of so many of the historical examples displayed, but also, and more importantly so, the availability of this extraordinary collection to the public view.

Chicagoland: The Second Time Around

Only if you are from the mid-West can you understand what we mean by cold, inclement weather.  That's what we had fro the second Chicogaland show.

The Antique Gambler Auction

Every auction has its highlights and this auction was no exception.  the events began with a cocktail party Friday evening at the Royal Americana Hotel and Casino hosted by Don Britt.  Tables were available for anyone desirous of showing scrapbooks, pictures and small items for sale.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Somehow this month's listings of serials reminds me of Colonel Custer's last words at the Little Big Horn... "Jeez, did you ever see so many different machines?

Results of the Geyer Absolute Auctions

  • Geyer Absolute Auction, Hunt Valley Maryland - August 2, 1981

  • Geyer Absolute Auction, Northeast Maryland - September 13, 1981

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Daval "Daval Gum Vender" - This article is a follow-up to the Daval "Chicago Club House" which appeared in the November 1981 issue.

2nd Metropolitan Advertising and Coin Op Show - Richard D. Reddock

The second Metropolitan Advertising, Country Store, Coin-Op and Toy Show opened in the Stadium Club at the Meadowland in Rutherford, New Jersey, Friday, September 11.

Calendar of Events

Pinball Troubleshooting - Russ Jensen

Sometime ago one of your readers suggested I devote an article or so to pinball repair and troubleshooting.  Since troubleshooting of pingames is one of my favorite pastimes (next to pinball history research, of course) I have decided to do just that. This will be the first of several articles dealing with the basic pinball circuitry and fundamental troubleshooting techniques.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Beblitz

The Care and Feeding of the Wurlitzer Automatic Music Roll Changer

Legislative Map

Legislative Update

Book Review - Dave Evans

Owner's Pictorial Guide For The Care And Understanding Of The Jennings Bell Slot Machine - Robert Geddes and Daniel Mead

Collectors Desires To Form Club

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubliner

Lights For A Penny

Restoration and Repair, This Month's Hint - Marc Harrison

Regarded by many as a poorly working and undesirable example of a slot machine, the Columbia is indeed a radical departure from conventional bell machine construction.  Despite its limited success, it represents a most ingenious design approach which incorporates many interesting features, and when properly adjusted in accordance with the following instructions, it can give long and trouble-free service.

Classifieds

 

February

1982

#84

COVER

The Jennings Perfected Jackpot "Blue Boy" Bell Machine. 

 

Two elfin characters known as "Blue Boys" took up new positions on the Perfected Jackpot of 1930.  They danced from the bottom of the case to the top.

 

There are several other changes as explained in the excerpt from "An Illustrated Price Guide to the 100 Most Collectible Slot Machines, Volume 3" on page 14.

 

The Jennings Perfected Jackpot "Blue Boy" Bell Machine on the cover was restored by Jeff Frahm of St. Louis Slot Machine Co.. and the photo is courtesy of Jeff Frahm and Tom Kolbrener.

 

INSIDE

Letters to the Editor

Editor's Statement  - Rosanna Harris

Our cover this month introduces us to a special challenge placed before us by a collector who has been involved in the hobby since its infancy.  Dave Evans has raised an extremely important question and even challenged us to take positive steps to make changes.  Our hobby is not unlike others in the collecting field.  There are natural ups and downs - growing periods and leveling off periods.

Cover Story - Jennings Perfected Jackpot "Blue Boy"

This is an excerpt from "An Illustrated Price Guide to the 100 Most Collectible Slot Machines, Volume3" written by Dick Bueschel.

The First Ten Years - Bill Harris

Have you ever asked yourself what our antique coin machine hobby would be like today if we eliminated certain personalities who have contributed so much to the coin operated field?

Those Mystical Wurlitzers - Ray Eklund

It was a fast rise and fall for the jukebox.  Call it social change, convenience of taped background music, or just the plain lack of popularity.  An operator of the 1930's and 40's based much of his legal income on the jukebox, not including the questionable use of the slot machine.

What's Wrong With Us? - Dave Evans

Reading the pages of The Coin Slot and Loose Change - talking to various collectors and dealers -you'd think that the slot collecting hobby is gasping its final breaths.  Frankly, I think we can all share part of the blame.  Yes, I admit the Nation's Economy is creating part of our doldrums, but it is about time that we quit feeling sorry for ourselves and start doing something about it.

Don't Overlook That Console!  - Phil Frey

Mills Bursting Cherry $1,800! Mills Golden Falls $1,800! Mills Jumbo Parade Console $800!  you might think that last machine is a bargain, right?  then consider the following.  Mills Castle Front $1,725! Jennings Sun Chief $1,250!  Watling Big Game Free Play Console $425! What!!

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

The Care and Feeding Of The Wurlitzer Automatic Music Roll Changer - Part 2

Casino Antiques Opens Showroom

New York, Dec. 1, 1981 - Casino Antiques Ltd. (NASDAQ symbol: RICHU), a New York based dealer in antique slot machines, coin-operated collectibles and memorabilia, today announced it has signed a lease to establish a showroom and retail sales store in Nassau County New York.

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

Counter stamped, engraved, elongated and encased coins - Over the years, many things have been done to coins to turn them into souvenirs, gifts, or forms of advertisements.  Back in the 19th century, many coins were counter stamped or engraved.  The counter stamps were made with a metal punch, containing a name and sometimes address and advertising message.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

We're doing something with the Serial Number Update this month that we've never done before.  All the machines this month are from on collection.  When Larry Peters in Saginaw, Michigan sat down to collect his serials for the update, he shot a photo of every machine.

In And Around Portland, Oregon - Fred Ryan

Fred Ryan, proprietor of the Slot Closet in Portland, Oregon shared some of the happenings in and around Portland with us.  We found them to be interesting and decided you might be interested in finding that there still are bargains out there.

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubliner

Book Review - Dave Evans

An Illustrated Price Guide To The Most Collectible Slot Machines, Volume 3, by Richard M. Bueschel, published by Coin Slot Books.

Pingame Troubleshooting, Part 2 - Russ Jensen

In the first article in this series on pingame troubleshooting we discussed the 'simple electric circuit' and the organization of a pinball schematic diagram.  We shall next discuss the basic electrical components which make up most electromechanical games.

Mickey Mouse and His Pals - Dave Bassitt

There were two (2) known Mickey Mouse machines in the gumball trade that are really unique, difficult to find, and without a doubt very rare.  This machine is called the Hamilton and when available sells for about $500 (five hundred dollars).  This machine is a collectors dream.  Looking at the machine it would be difficult to know that the Hamilton has real value.

Notes From Nic -  Nic Costa

John George Brenner, the founder of what might now be aptly termed 'the Brenner dynasty,' was born in Germany in 1883.  Although little has been recorded about his early life, his connections with the toy manufacturing industry suggest that he came from the area of Germany around Nuremburg, which at the time of his birth was at the center of a world wide tin toy manufacturing industry.  By the early years of the present century he had emigrated to England, establishing himself in Manchester.

Legislative Map

Status of the States

Why a 25 Year Law? Rosanna Harris

Just before Christmas the authorities in Maryland went into action and began confiscating slot machines from dealers and private collectors.  Our information indicates that at least four of our people were involved and as many as 25 machines.  Maryland has a pre-1941 law and apparently  the police decided to enforce it.

Kentucky Could Be Next

One of our readers in Kentucky wrote to us to let us know that a bill has been introduced in the Kentucky legislature which would decriminalize the ownership of antique slot machines.

Legislative Update

Classified Ads

 

March

1982

#85

COVER

The Caille Quinette produced between 1901 and 1913 is a phenomenal machine!  It combined five trade stimulators in one and did it in one marvelous cabinet on its own pedestal.

This gorgeous example is in Steve Cohen's collection (you remember Steve - Maryland's Champion).  The photograph was taken by Philip Faux.

This is one of approximately eight machines that are known to exist.  Perhaps there are a few more out there still waiting to be restored to the like beauty of this one.

 

ARTICLES

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Pierce Tool Manufacturing Corp - Hit Me, Army 21 Game, Here's How

Pace Manufacturing Company - Cardinal, Hol-E-Smokes, Suds

 

All of the machines in this article are an offspring of the Pierce and Pace The New Deal which was covered in the December 1981 issue.

Cover Story - The Caille Quinette

Produced between 1901 and 1903 - This is an excerpt from "An Illustrated Price Guide To the 100 Most Collectible Trade Stimulators, Volume 2" written by Dick Bueschel.

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Class 2 Wurlitzers - Models 50,51,61,41,71 and 81. - Countertop Wurlitzer jukeboxes appear small at first glance, but there is nothing small about them.  One person can barely carry one.  It has fewer parts to a mechanism, so should be easier to adjust - hardly.  The cabinets were designed to take up less space than a conventional jukebox - well sorta.  You would also assume a countertop is easier to restore - no way. There is very little that is small about these jukeboxes.  One thing big about a countertop is the price and that is certain to grow in years to come.

Anatomy of a Slot Machine Addict Or Why St. Louis Slot Machine Co. - Jeff Frahm

Like many of you dedicated slot machine collectors out there, I had often dreamed of being able to turn my hobby into a business.  For years I spent most of my free time building a collection and learning as much as I possibly could about these wonderful old machines.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

The World's Most Successful Violin Playing Machine: Part 1 - First marketed in 1908, the Hupfeld Phonoliszt-Violina was not only the most successful violin playing machine; it was also one of the most successful music machines ever made by any manufacturers, with over 10,000 instruments sold during the following two decades.  Three basic models - A,B and C - were produced. Models A and B were mechanically similar, with the A having an ornate, rectangular cabinet around the violin mechanism, and the model B having rounded violin compartment doors.  the model C was completely redesigned and had a "modern" cabinet.  Of the three styles, the model B was most widely sold and accounts for most of the remaining examples.

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

 

Claus Ahrens, now more familiarly known as charles, was born in Germany in the late 1860's.  His early life is still shrouded in mystery although it is known that by the turn of the century, having trained as a mechanical engineer, he emigrated to England, where he joined the community of expatriate Germans working in London, who were then largely employed in the automatic music industry.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

We've done it again.  This month's serial updates were all supplied by one collector, plus the photos to boot.  The selection is broad, and the material most interesting.  The collector is Kevin Hammerbeck, a collector and now a dealer who has been active in antique coin machines for five years.

Pinball Troubleshooting, Part 3 - Russ Jensen

 

In the first article in this series on pinball troubleshooting we listed five areas of understanding which were considered 'basic' to tracking down malfunctions in electro-mechanical games.  The first two areas (the basic electrical circuit and schematic diagrams) were covered in that first article.  In last month's article we began by discussing power sources and their associated wiring in the machine. This month we will continue the discussion of components by covering some of those which were the 'loads' in the basic circuit previously mentioned.

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubliner

What's The Big Deal - Rosanna Harris

You may say "What is the big deal about having a 25 year law?  Our state lets us own slot machines as long as they were manufactured prior to 1941.  So what if I can't legally have a _____.  I can own one anyway.  The authorities don't really know how old each different model is."  Would you like to risk your machine on that?

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

Five More Puzzling Tokens

Altered Slot Machine Ruled Legal - Again

 

DEPARTMENTS

Letters to the Editor

Editor's Statement

Last fall Mr. Russell called us and painfully told us that his shop had been broken into and his double Dewey was stolen.  He turned to us and asked for any help we could lend.  His was not the first plea for help, but it did cause us to initiate a column which we felt could be a service not only to those who had the misfortune of losing machines, but also to prospective buyer of stolen merchandise.

Stolen

The following 24 machines were stolen in Ohio on February 5, 1982 between the hours of 12:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m.

  1. Caille Cast Iron Tourist

  2. Mills/Iowa Novelty Co./Dean Simplex Counter Vender - Serial #87593

  3. Mills Iron Case Operators Bell

  4. Jennings Nickel Silent Victoria Peacock

  5. Watling Nickel Cherry Front Rol-A-Top - Serial #70001

  6. Mills War Eagle - First 3 numbers in Serial Number are 331

  7. Mills/Rockola Nickel Conversion Jackpot, 4 Column Mint Vender

  8. Mills Nickel Bluefront - reproduction case

  9. Mills Penny Extrabell - reproduction case

  10. Mills Nickel Reproduction Extrabell

  11. Mills Dime Reproduction Extrabell

  12. Mills Nickel Silent F.O.K. - Serial #278706

  13. Mills Bursting Cherry

  14. Watling Penny Twin Jackpot Gumball vender

  15. Jennings Penny Little Duke

  16. Aristocrat Poker - Quarter

  17. Aristocrat Poker - Quarter

  18. Aristocrat Poker - Quarter

  19. Aristocrat Poker - Quarter - Serial #106553

  20. Bally Magnificent 7 Quarter - First five digits of Serial #10654

  21. Bally Silver Dollar with Gold Dust Casino name - Serial #18600

  22. Bally 3 line progressive - Quarter - Serial #106529

  23. Bally Multiplier - Quarter

  24. Bally Multiplier - Quarter

Legislative Map

Status of the States

Legislative Update

Classifieds

May

1982

#87

COVER

This Mills Dewey Floor Machine is one of the feature machines in Roy Arrington's 10th Victorian Casino Antique Auction being held May 1 and 2.  This particular type of machine can be said to be the prime Victorian slot machine collectible because of its overall style, color and "marvelous mechanism."

 

In our June issue we will report the results from Roy's auction and certainly this Dewey will be one of the highlights.

 

ARTICLES

Information Regarding the Gambling Devices Act of 1962

On October 18, 1962, the President signed into law Public Law 87-840 known as the Gambling Devices Act of 1962.  This Act contained amendments to the Johnson Act (64 Stat. 1134, 15 U.S.C. 1171, et seq.) passed in 1951 relating to the manufacture and transportation of gambling devices in interstate and foreign commerce.

Antique Slot Machine Part Company - Holly Krahl

Parts, parts, parts is what turns my husband on!  Parts and collecting more and more coin operated machines!  Little did I know how slot machines would effect us ten years ago when we got married and ate breakfast in our kitchen with three slot machines. 

Rare Find By Casino Restorations - Keith W. Amundson

This machine defies all common slots.  It is one of a kind, and only one in existence.  If there were a serial number on it, I'm sure it would be #1.

Tom Thumb, The Money Maker - Dave Bassitt

I sure did get tired of working hard all day, scarcely ever making ends meet.  Once in awhile a friend would get a good break and go up in the world, but that only made me more blue, for I was in a rut.

 

It was a red letter day when I found out about the Tom Thumb P-Nut Vender!  Now other people work for yours truly, and Mister Woolworth hasn't a thing on me!

Thoughts From Our English "Cousin" Or How Slots Have Changed My Life - Mick Harris

Whenever we in this great country of ours let ourselves get depressed about our slots and other collectibles, return to this issue and reread this account of your English counterpart.  It is bound to have a positive effect.  Perhaps you will more readily say, "Wait until tomorrow; things surely couldn't get worse...or could they?!"

Writing A Book About Pinball: A Progress Report - Dick Bueschel

If you take all of the advertisements ever printed for automatic payout slot machines that ran in The Billboard, Champion of Fair Play, The New York Clipper, The National Police Gazette, Automatic Age, The Coin Machine Journal, Automatic World, Spinning Reels, Tips and Topics, National Operators Automatic Gazette, Replay Magazine, Marketplace, Play meter and the other trade and in-house publications that have served the coin-operated machine industry from the 1880's to the present (and if you made a xerox copy of each page) you'd have a stack of paper five feet high.  Trade stimulators would be half that.  So would scales, although arcade machines would run a close second to the slots at close to five feet.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Exhibit Card Vender - As of this writing, you are looking at my latest purchase.  I made the mistake of bragging about my latest find and showing it off to my friends and other coin-op dealers where the general line of thought ended up as, "So, what you gonna do with it?" of "Who the hell will buy it?".  Well, so much for my great find, now let's road test it.

What's Wrong With Us: A Follow-Up - Dave Evans

I have been writing articles for The Coin Slot and Loose Change for many years, mainly because I enjoy the slot machine hobby - and also I feel strongly that you should put something back into any project that you are getting some benefit out of.  I have written articles that were designed to create some controversy - anything to get some response from other collectors.  Frankly, the response was under-whelming - nothing!  It seemed very difficult to get a rise out of the slot collectors.  However - my article on "What's Wrong With Us" sure hit a hot button!  For a change, the extreme silence was broken!  I have had phone calls, letters, and notes on orders.  Hooray - the collectors have finally awakened!

Caveat Emptor - Alan Sax

Caveat Emptor is a Latin expression which translates "let the buyer beware." Webster's dictionary defines the phrase as "a principal in commerce: without a warranty the buyer takes the risk of quality upon himself".

George J. Krone Auction

Unfortunately the Krones were unable to hold their scheduled auction in Las Vegas on March 13 and 14.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

Questions and Answers

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

In 1901 Walter Streets, now perhaps the best remembered of the Streets family, was born.  His father was Henry Streets, a traveling showman.  Showmanship was a family tradition, and it was expected that as soon as young Walter was old enough he would turn to showmanship for his living.  In 1917 when Walter was aged 16, he and his two brothers, Harry and William, were sent out by their father to tour the show grounds in the family's motor van as sideshow operators running a 'canary' game.

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Class 4 Wurlitzers: Models 700,800,750, 780 and 850 - The golden decade of Wurlitzer jukebox production began in 1940.  Wurlitzer was king.  Each year new concepts in jukebox cabinets were being produced by Wurlitzer.  The 24 select mechanism not only proved durable, but the visible record changer was a success.

Pinball Troubleshooting - Russ Jensen

This month we will discuss the third and final type of component which makes up the basic electrical circuit, the 'switch' (often referred to as 'contacts' or 'points').  the switch provides the control of the operation of the circuit by turning on and off the flow of electric current from the 'power source'  to the 'load.'  Switch malfunctions probably account for 80 to 90 percent of the electrical problems occurring in games. Most of these troubles are caused by dirty or misadjusted switch contacts.  Correction of these types of problems will be discussed on next month's issue.

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubliner

Questions and Answers

Exhibit Card Vender Answers

The answers below refer to the photo of the Exhibit Card Vender on page 31 in Paul Olson's article.  The Slot Shoppe, and the movie stars pictured on the original poster that came with the machine.   How many of the movie stars could you name?

 

Answer to the pictures fro the top left to right: Elizabeth Taylor, Ava Gardner, Dean martin & Jerry Lewis, Jeff chandler, Doris Day, Virginia Mayo, Frank Lovejoy, Audie Murphy, Piper Laurie, Gigi Perreau, Randolph Scott, Steve Cochran

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

What tokens are made of...Over the past two centuries, tokens have been made from a great variety of metals and other materials.  Sometimes economic conditions have determined the composition of tokens.

 

DEPARTMENTS

Letters to the Editor

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

This month again finds the slot machine collector with a dilemma.  Those readers who do not collect slot machines or who have the good fortune of living in England, Europe or Australia may find our selective writing on the problems facing slot collectors boring or tiresome.  We can sympathize with your feelings, but on the other hand you may be able to appreciate your enviable position more easily if you understand the brick walls and mazes facing the slot collectors.

Cover Story

This is an excerpt from "An Illustrated Price Guide to the 100 Most Collectible Slot Machines, Volume 1 Revised" written by Dick Bueschel.

In the Next Issue

Send a Sample to a Friend

List of Advertisers

Calendar

Classifieds

June

1982

#88

COVER

The original 3 disc model of the WHIRLWIND, center, is somewhat of a rarity as it was in production only a few months before the 3 reel variation, left, was put into production.  Right is the revamp by Silver King Novelty Company, the LITTLE PRINCE.

 

FEATURES

Victorian Casino Antiques Auction - Dave Evans

Dave Evans reviews the events of the annual Roy Arrington Auction and provides some thought provoking questions.

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Bill Whelan provides us with our cover story this month, discussing the Pierce Tool Manufacturing Co. WHIRLWINDs and the revamp by Silver King Novelty Co.

Reflections - Fred Ryan

A new author to The Coin Slot, Fred Ryan displays part of his collection of old photographs.  Can you find the coin operated machines in them?

Writing A Book About Pinball: A Progress Report - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel continues his interesting article about the progress of his new book An Illustrated Guide to the 100 Most Collectible Pinballs, Volume 1.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

Art Reblitz describes this collector's favorite, the Wurlitzer Pianino

Pinball Troubleshooting, Part 5 Continued - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen continues last month's article with further discussion of pinball switches and switch maintenance.

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Ray Eklund ends his article the month with and exciting list of Wurlitzer serial numbers

 

 

ARTICLES

Letter to the Editor

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

The Results of Roy Arrington's Victorian Casino Antiques Collector's Auction - Rosanna Harris

Las Vegas was the backgound for the 10th Victorian Casino Antiques Collectors Auction on May 1 and 2 1982.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Williams HAYBURNERS II

100 Years of Pinball Machines

A few yards from the Pompidou Center, the Las Vegas Museum hoses the world's most important collection of coin-operated machines.

Book Review - Dave Evans

Donate Less To The I.R.S.: by Larry Crumbley and Jerry Curtis, published by Vestal Press, Vestal, N.Y. and available from COIN SLOT BOOKS - Harvey Roehl of Vestal Press certainly did the entire collecting world a great favor by publishing this book.  This is a 'must' read no matter what you collect, slots, Chippendale furniture, antique autos or whatever.

Calendar of Events

Notes from Nic - Nic Costa

William Thompson was born in Birmingham in the late 1860's.  He received little, if any, formal education, starting work as in a brass foundry whilst still a boy.

Status of the States

Restoration and Repair -Marc Harrison

Electric Console Payouts: Why the electric console machines do not enjoy the popularity amongst collectors as do they bell-type cousins is a mystery to me.  These units truly represent the paragon of slot machine design, offering the ultimate in appearance, mechanical sophistication, and play appeal.

List of Advertisers

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubliner

Subscription Form

Classified Contest Winners

Classified Ads

July

1982

#89

COVER

Corey Loos, right and Christopher Loos, left, the sons of collector Nick Loos of Quincy Illinois, play with the In-and-Outdoor Games WHOOPEE, circa June 1931, and rated by many as the "first" pinball game.  The WHOOPEE in the Loos collection is in mint condition, virtually as crisp as the day it left the factory in Chicago over half a century ago.  Read the conclusion of "Writing A Book About Pinball:  A Progress Report" by Dick Bueschel this month.

 

FEATURES

Chicagoland News - Rosanna Harris

Rosanna Harris reviews and comments on the Chicagoland Show.

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

Nic Costa brings to life Gordon Smith and the legacy he left to the English automatics Industry.

Writing A Book About Pinball: A Progress Report - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel concludes his continuing report on the planned series of An Illustrated Price Guide to the 100 Most Collectible pinball Machines Volumes.

Put Yourself In The Books - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel asks for your help and contribution to his planned pinball guides

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Ray Eklund describes the Class 6 Wurlitzer models and continues his list of serial numbers with pre-war jukeboxes.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

Art Reblitz covers some of the common problems encountered with the coin mechanisms of music machines.

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Bill Whelan brings to us the Art Deco designed machines manufactured by the Buckley Manufacturing Co.

Pinball Troubleshooting Part 6 Basic Circuits - Russ Jensen

Heed Russ Jensen's warning but don't miss this article if you repair pinball games.

 

FEATURES

Letters to the Editor

Ultimate for Gamblers

Editor's Statement - Debi Knight

A First - Rosanna Harris

Roy Arrington's auction was the scene of a very special meeting.  Three grandsons of the original slot machine manufacturers were together for the first time.  March Fey and Tony Mills have now one another for 20 years.  Their wives Shirley and Eleanor practically raised the Fey and Mills children together when they lived 3 doors apart on the same block in Reno.

Jukeboxes at Chicagoland - Ray Eklund

 

Jukeboxes made the Chicagoland Slot Machine Show in numbers this year.  There was on Rockola Master, and the rest were Wurlitzers.

National Collectibles Expo - Rich Hartzog

The Third Annual National Collectibles Exposition was held March 13 and 14 at the Ramada O'Hare Inn in Des Plaines, Illinois.

Vending Vignette - Dave Bassitt

Merchandise vending machines represent a safe investment with steady returns provided the machines used are attractive in appearance, mechanically perfect, and are convertible to vend more than one particular item.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Game Plan - FOXY LADY: You drop your quarter in the slot and push the start button, you hear the distinct music which only a computer operated machine makes, and you are ready to play.

Calendar of Events

Reflections - Fred Ryan

This month's group of Cigar Store views is of varied quality.

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

Amusement Arcades: Amusement arcades originally presented a wide array of machines to amuse the customer or test their abilities or skill.  Some arcades may have had payout gambling machines, but usually only non-gambling arcade machines were present.

31 One-Armed Bandits May Lose Life and Limb

Thirty-one slot machines seized by police from a San Jose store in February were ordered destroyed Wednesday by Judge John Schatz in Santa Clara County Superior Court.

Status of the States

Restoration and Repair - Marc Harrison

Mill's SILENTS - the most popular bell machines of their time, when first introduced over fifty years ago, and still the most frequently encountered machines in collections today.  Unfortunately, the most proven design feature of the SILENTS was the unreliability of the coin chute mechanism.

Arcade Magic - Steve Gronowski

Advertised in their day as "...a sensational earner and easily...the leader of all coin operated amusement devices," the IRON CLAW proved to be a popular draw in arcades and carnivals with all folks, young and old.

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubliner

Book Review - Ray Eklund

The Official Victory Glass PRICE GUIDE to ANTIQUE JUKEBOXES, 1982 Edition, Illustrated, by Stephen K. Loots.

Classifieds

August

1982

#90

COVER

Pictured on the cover this month is a 1928 Capehart Orchestrope, a commercial phonograph manufactured by the Capehart Corporation in the days before the term "jukebox" was in general use.  the owner was John Wilcox, the beautiful restoration work was done by John Mangrum.  the photo is also courtesy of John Mangrum of Showcase Picture Frames, 11 Oro Village, Oroville, California 95965.

 

FEATURES

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

Steve Alpert introduces the diversity and quantity of different tokens to be found throughout the world, from the past to the new ones currently being manufactured.

Gambling Antiques Under One Roof - Len Schneir

Len Schneir displays and describes a selection of his intriguing antique, gambling related postcards, many of which contain slot machines, from his extensive collection to pique our interest in this collectible.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel shares the great photography of Richard Taylor and some of his comments about the slot machines pictured, along with the usual serial number list.

Jukebox Record - Bill Butterfield

Bill Butterfield details the fascinating account of Homer Capehart and the manufacturing of his exquisite commercial phonographs through their heyday.

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

Nic Costa bring to life the exploits of the Barron family, now little known but active in the earliest days of the amusement industry in England

Stim-Mania - Bill Whelan

Bill Whelan continues his description of the Buckley Manufacturing Company's Art Deco designed trade stimulators

Pinball Troubleshooting - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen concludes his descriptions of the electrical circuitry found in pinballs with tips for diagnosing the malfunctions in a game.

 

ARTICLES

Letters To The Editor

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

September, 1982, is a month to remember for at least two good reasons in our mind.  It will mark the 8th anniversary of The Coin Slot and the 6th Anniversary of the California law's passage.  Does it seem like six years could have passed since Jerry Kenzer led the fight for a change in California's law?

Status Of The States

Vending Vignette - Dave Bassitt

The Vendex is, without a doubt, a unique machine to be found only on the east coast.  The Vendex was built in New England by New England mechanics.  The Vendex Co. was located in Boston Massachusetts.  Very few of these machines exist in the United States.  If I made an offer of $100 for knowing about collectors who own this machine, I would be hard pressed to be spending very little money.

Arcade Magic

Exhibit Supply Company's Diggers - Exhibit Supply Company enjoyed the popular success of their Iron Claw machines and manufactured several variations of this same theme, calling these models Diggers.  Exhibit felt that there no other types of coin operated machines that had the attractiveness and playing power of an Exhibit Digger, and their advertising said so.  Emphasizing that Diggers were not ordinary gaming devices, Exhibit tried to legitimize the operation of the machines as a highly esteemed business enterprise, one that did not require large sums of money to get into.

Calendar Of Events

Reflections - Fred Ryan

At the Roadhouse Cafe of not so many years ago, spare change was not something for patrons to keep in their pockets.  A few well placed coin-ops played an important part in helping to pay the overhead.  Nestled right in there with the salt shakers, one would be likely to find gumball and nut vender, punchboards, and perhaps an occasional slot machine.  If any of these devices failed, the ever present jukebox could garner a coin or two.

Post Office Request

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Americoin Dozer - Americoin's Dozer is different to say the least.  The color is lime green with black trim and safety stripes, the slanted front is a solid glass sheet, and inside, on vacuum molded plastic, is the complete mining scene on the three walls of the machine.

Pappy Sez: - Larry Lubliner

Classified Ads

September

1982

#91

COVER

The cover photo this month illustrates two beautifully restored slot machines of the popular Mills' Q.T. line.  A favorite with collectors, this line of slot machines was an innovation in its time, and became an important product for Mills Novelty Co., giving rise to a variety of differently styled models.  Read "the Mills' Q.T. - Saga of a "Reel Cutie."  Cover photo is courtesy of David Saul.

 

FEATURES

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Paul Olson introduces us to the "Stranger" and a most interesting slot machine story.

An Interesting Clock/Vending Machine - Les Druyan

Les Druyan visits The Coin Slot to describe a most unusual and interesting coin machine of foreign vintage.

The Mills Q.T. - Saga Of A "Reel Cutie" - David Saul

David Saul features this popular line of Mills machines, tracing their history and playability.  Our cover story for his month.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

Art Reblitz updates his list of Seeburg coin piano serial numbers begun in an earlier issue, and encounters a Seeburg mystery piano.

Pinball Troubleshooting, Part 7 - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen solves your pinball problems with another article in his series about pinball circuitry.

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Bill Whelan describes and illustrates a dandy little trade stimulator, made  by several manufacturers with lots of photos.

Restoration and Repair - Marc Harrision

Marc Harrison reveals the secrets of clock mechanism repair and maintenance to keep your slot machine in running order.

 

ARTICLES

Letters to the Editor

Guest Editorial - Les Druyan

Arcade Magic - Steve Gronowski

Exhibit supply Company's ROTARY MERCHANDISER/NOVELTY CANDY VENDER - Exhibit Supply Company of Chicago, Illinois, manufactured two varieties of machines that worked along the same concept as the DIGGERS, the ROTARY MERCHANDISER and the NOVELTY CANDY VENDOR.  These machines were first manufactured in the 'thirties' and reached the height of their popularity in the 'forties'.  They were originally made in 1˘ and 5˘ models primarily, but are now found also in 10˘ and 25˘ play, having been converted to larger denominations in more recent years.

The Token Corner - Stephen P. Alpert

Advertising Pocket Mirrors - Many companies that made tokens and medals also manufactured advertising novelties such as calendars, rulers, letter openers, and, the subject of this month's article, pocket mirrors.  I'm unaware of any such advertising giveaways by the coin machine manufacturers.  It seems they stuck to the sales catalogues and magazine advertising and didn't go in for giving out little gifts bearing their names.  However, many businesses such as stores and saloons, which had coin machines on their premises, gave out pocket mirrors advertising their establishments.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

A little of this and a little of that adds up to a lot of interesting stuff.  this month is a prime example.  In its own capsule way it's a mini-history of the development of the automatic payout slot machine, and it took eleven collectors willing to share their serial numbers and photos to make this month's update happen.

Reflections - Fred Ryan

A stroll through the business district of yesteryear might take one past the "Combination Store," as this type of establishment was known.  With a cigar and confectionary store at the front, a pool room at the rear, and perhaps a tonsorial parlor on the side, they were sort of convenience store for men.  A sign on the wall might also advise "Employment Agency service to prospective employers at no charge."

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Jukebox Reproductions: Fact or Fantasy? - Auto collectors have seen it happen. Slot machine collectors have seen it happen.  Nickelodeon collectors, stained glass, toy, gumball machine, cast iron bank, beer stein collectors have seen it happen - reproductions.  Many specialized collectors has found reproductions a threat to their investments. Why buy an old original, when a new reproduction may cost much less and provide just as much satisfaction to the man with the limited budget?

Calendar of Events

Notes from Nic - Nic Costa

Ruffler and Walker, The Early Years - the growth of the firma of Ruffler and Walker in the years following the Second World War was little short of phenomenal.  In a relatively brief span of some 10 years or so they were to become the giants of the English automatics industry, expanding at a time when most of the great names of the industry were in decline.  The story of their rise to prominence is truly the classic of 'rags to riches.'

Legislative Update

Status of the States

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubiner

Classified Ads

October

1982

Vol.8, No. 2

COVER

"Revamped and repainted Keeney 5˘/25˘ CRISS CROSS of 1952 to upgrade coinage to 50˘/$1 play and guaranteed jackpots and colorful flash, probably by Hot Springs, Arkansas, re-vamper John W. Sampson, circa 1965."  But this is only one short paragraph of the whole story.  Read Dick Bueschel's "Cross Breed CRISS CROSS."

 

FEATURES

The Mills' Q.T. - Saga of a "Reel Cutie" - David Saul

David Saul finishes his story on the history and development of one of the more popular slot machines manufactured by the Mills Novelty Company

Cover Story: Cross Breed CRISS CROSS - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel complicated a simple request and writes a fascinating account of the history behind the CRISS CROSS pictured on this month's cover

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

Nic Costa brings to life the character of Fred Bollard and his escapades in the British Automatics industry buying and selling failing companies

Put Another Nickel In  - Art Reblitz

Art Reblitz discusses and illustrates in photographic detail on of the most unusual musical instruments ever invented - the CHORALCELO

Pinball Troubleshooting Part 7 - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen ties together his previous articles by describing a complex game functions and how it operates.

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Ray Eklund expands upon the Wurlitzer line by describing and picturing pre-war speakers - accessories made available by Wurlitzer to compliment their jukeboxes.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel returns with lots of machines, lots of people, lots of serial numbers and especially, lot of great photos.

 

ARTICLES

Letter

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

The collectible field today has developed for many reasons, but one of the most interesting is that we find the American creative genius with machines to be extremely fascinating.  This fascination does not end with the machines that were manufactured 25 years ago or more.

Pen and Paper- Rosanna Harris

 

There are more authors/writers among us than most of us have ever seriously taken time to consider.  We'd like for you to take a few moments of your time and consider taking up the pen and paper to fill a need in The Coin Slot.

Arcade Magic - Steve Gronowski

 

The final arcade device in the family of IRON CLAW machines to be featured is the DREDGER.  It was manufactured by the Standard Game Company, which was located at the same addressed used by Exhibit Supply Company in Chicago, Illinois.

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

Throughout our history, there have been many times when conditions necessitated a large number and variety of similar tokens to be issued.  the tokens of each episode form natural groups or categories of tokens, which are popular among collectors, with most collectors specializing in one or two groups.  I'll summarize these series of tokens below, in chronological order.

Reflections - Fred Ryan

If some of the establishments in this group of photographs bear strong resemblance to saloons it is because many of them were just that.  With the moral wave of prohibition upon them in 1920, many a saloon became a soda parlor to keep their doors open.

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Trade Stimulator Serial Numbers (Daval Manufacturing Co. Machines)  Most trade stimulator manufacturers were not in the habit of placing serial numbers on their creations, but there was on that stood out above all of the rest in doing so.  It was the Daval Manufacturing Co. of Chicago.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Gottlieb GRIDIRON - Put a football theme on a coin-operated machine and you almost grab those football follower's attention.  Checking over pinball machines for this month's article has hard, and I narrowed it down to three with the GRIDIRON being the newest and most exciting.

5˘ Pace Missing

Please be alerted that a 5˘ Pace with a side vender, serial number 219679 was given to a dealer for reconditioning after an auction in Ft. Scott Kansas, earlier this year.  The machine has not been returned, the dealer's telephone has been disconnected and all attempts at locating him have proven fruitless.

Legislative Action

This correspondence was sent to The Coin Slot by a collector from the state of New Jersey.  New Jersey recently changed their pre-1941 definition to one of defining collectible slot machines as 30 years old or older.

Status of the States

The Coin Slot encourages all states to adopt legislation legalizing the ownership of collectible slot machines 25 years or older and encourages all readers to support and participate in changing the laws in their states.

Pappy Sez - Larry Lubliner

Vending Vignette - Dave Bassitt

Blue Bird products, the manufacturers of the BLUE BIRD, made in excess of 500,000 BLUE BIRDS.  this machine is frequently seen, and, if I might comment, carries value only with the original decals, which makes the machine very desirable.

List of Advertisers

Slots Doomed to Death in Ohio

The Coin Slot Gets Involved

It has come to The Coin Slot's attention in the latter part of July that the state of Ohio has a problem: whether or not to destroy fifteen collectible slot machines seized in a raid.

December

1982

Vol.8, No. 4

COVER

Featured on the cover of The Coin Slot this month is Squire's and Corrie's "Million Dollar Slot Machine."  Conceived and executed through the partnership of Steve Squires and reknown San Francisco jeweler, Sidney Mobel, this slot machine is truly something the world has never seen before.  plated in gold, jeweled with literally hundreds of diamonds, rubies and sapphires, played with hand-dipped gold plated Liberty nickels, this machine is for the collector who has everything.  Read more about this unitque item, and the men who made it happen, in "Steve Squires At Large, Part II."  Cover photo taken by Steve Patience of Squires and Corrie, San Mateo, California.

 

FEATURES

News and Views

Catch up on recent events and new games in the coin-operated machine field.  This column includes the latest news from the corporations and manufactures that make the news happen

How Big Is A Micro-computer? - Rick Schlueter

Rick Schlueter explains the advantages of using a computer in your business and introduces the reasonably priced micro-computer used by many businesses to increase productivity.

Have a Party for Promotion - Carol Kantor

Carol Kantor gives tips on how to plan a party for your arcade business to attract future customers and re-excite present patrons.

Games in Review: The Arcade Parade - Mike Pugliese

Mike Pugliese reviews two new games recently released by the manufactures.  Read this column to see how Pengo, from Sega, and Joust, from Williams, rate on his list of games.

Christmas Card from The Coin Slot

A Christmas wish from all of us to all of you

Pappy Sez: - Larry Lubliner

"The Fun Fair: Observations of Pappy"  is an appropriate title for Larry Lubliner's review of this special event held once a year in California

 

VINTAGE COLLECTIBLES

The Token Corner - Steve Alpert

Steve Alpert tells "How I started collecting coin machine tokens."

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Paul Olson describes a Mercury Athletic Scale and how it operates.

Steve Squire At Large, Part II - Robert Geddes

Robert Geddes completes his interview with "The man who makes slot machines dance."

Reflections - Fred Ryan

Fred Ryan focuses on saloons of yesteryear and the coin machines found inside

The Art of Cabinet Restorations - Jeff Frahm

Jeff Frahm shares his expertise in refinishing cabinets to their original beautiful condition

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Bill Whelan gets off the beaten path with a 1929 Freund Tric It counter coin flop.

Calendar of Events

What's happening where.

Pinball Troubleshooting Part 8, Continued - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen continues his trouble-shooting techniques with Clip Lead Testing.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

"An Unusual Bruder Band Organ" is illustrated through a myriad of photos from Art Reblitz.

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Ray Eklund advises on how to start a jukebox collection, and how not to.

 

ARTICLES

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

Letter

List of Advertisers

Classified Advertising

January

1983

Vol.8, No. 4

COVER

MS. PAC-MAN. manufactured and marketed by the Bally Manufacturing Company, graces the cover this month.  An unexpected and run-away success itself, and successor to another very popular game, PAC-MAN, The Coin Slot takes a closer look at MS. PAC-MAN and what accounts for its popularity.  Cover photo compliments of Bally Manufacturing Co. with our thanks for their cooperation.

 

FEATURES

It's MS. PAC-MAN - Alan Sax

Alan Sax analyses what attracts players to MS. PAC-MAN and keeps them coming back time after time in this light hearted review of MS. PAC-MAN.

From An Investor's Point of View: MS. PAC-MAN And Its Impact on Bally - Richard Reddock

Richard Reddock examines Bally Manufacturing Co. and its many enterprises, and discusses the changes brought about by the success  of MS. PAC-MAN.

Game Repair: MS. PAC-MAN - Steve Lawless, Jay Hanna and Alan Preis

An exciting new column is introduced in The Coin Slot this month dealing with the troubleshooting and repair of video games.  Written by the combined efforts of the staff of Antares Game Repair, MS. PAC-MAN is the first topic they discuss.

Authors Salute

The Coin Slot would like to recognize the many authors who contribute to its pages through the year and thank them for their labors.

Games in Review: The Arcade Parade - Mike Pugliese

Mike Pugliese briefly reviews many of the video games shown at the recent AMOA show in Chicago and talks about new developments in the industry.

Letters

News & Views

This column includes the latest news from the manufacturers and companies involved in the exciting coin-op machine industry.

The Parts of a Micro-computer - Paul Olson

Rick Schlueter covers in more detail each the components that make up a micro-computer system.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Paul Olson takes us back to the early '70's and the game that started the video craze - PONG.

Status of the States

Classified Ads

Advertisers' Index

 

VINTAGE COLLECTIBLES

Arcade Magazine - Steve Gronowski

Steve Gronowski describes the SMILING SAM, The Voodoo Man machine from Exhibit Supply Company

Vending Vignette - Dave Bassitt

Dave Bassitt introduces the Moderne Peanut Vendor

The Token Corner - Steve Alpert

Steve Alpert identifies another gambling ship from the '30s

A Review of Pingames at the 1982 Fun Fair - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen describes twelve pre-1950 pinballs displayed at this recent show

National Collectibles Expo

Notes from Nic- Nic Costa

 

Nic Costa remembers the British firm of Haydon and Urry, pioneers in the world of "automatics"

Restoration and Repair - Marc Harrison

Marc Harrison discussed the proper restoration of slot machine mechanisms and the results

Request from Help from Montana

Help for the legalization of collectible slots

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Ray Eklund helps you find the missing parts for your broken jukebox

Reflections - Fred Ryan

Fred Ryan focuses on the destruction of slots in Portland Oregon

February

1983

Vol.8, No.6

FEATURES

Infringement Games: A Bad Buy - Michael Pugliese

Mike Pugliese comments on the growth of the video game industry and the positive and negative elements within the industry that growth has spawned.

The Reproducing Piano of the Future - Debra Harner

Debra Harner introduces the modern counterpart to a traditional player piano.  A Computerized piano that is now being manufactured by the Marantz Piano Company whose repertoire ranges from rock to classical.

Game Repair: Electronic Game Power Supplies - Jay Hanna, Steve Lawless and Alan Preis

The staff of Antares Game Repair shares their knowledge of video games by describing the symptoms of power supply failure and proper repairs.

"Premiere" of a Game - Carol Kantor

Carol Kantor lends advice on how to introduce a new game to the patrons of an established arcade location.

Editors Statement

Letters

News & Views

The latest news from the businesses involved in the coin machine industry.

How to Buy a Micro-computer - Rick Schlueter

Status of the States

Stolen

Classified Advertising

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Paul Olson describes Atari's popular TANK video game from the '70's

 

VINTAGE COLLECTIBLES

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Ray Eklund advises on how to deal with your local jukebox collector, must reading

Dateline...November 1982 Destination Chicago - Joe Vojacek

Joe Vojacek reviews the success of the Chicagoland Show and the people who were there

Payout Probabilities - Roger Smith

Roger Smith enlightens us about the intricacies of calculating the payout of coin drop trade stimulators

Legislation for Arkansas

A call for help from hopeful in Arkansas

Notes from Nic - Nic Costra

Nic Costra writes about a brave attempt by two English collectors to present to the public some of the automatic machines of times gone by.

The Six Stages of Slot Collecting - Dave Evans

Dave Evans describes the various stages of knowledge, accomplishment and expertise that slot collectors might encounter

Vending Vignette - Dave Bassitt

Dave Bassitt covers the unusual Masters 1˘/5˘ Plain Front gum and peanut vendor

Pinball Collecting Brought Up To Date - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen discusses new additions to some of the larger pinball collections across the country

March

1983

Vol. 8, No.7

COVER

On the cover of this issue appears the popular video game, MEGADON, recently released by a new company to the electronic game field, Photar.  Photar's young President, Dave Hacker, founded the firm last year in Florida, a location he chose because of its proximity to the space program and the talented, creative people it attracts.  Hacker is confident of his company's success and tells why in the feature article by Jim Kokoris, "Photar Industries Blasts Off."  Cover photo compliments of Photar and Jim Kokoris of Golin/Harris Communications, Inc.

 

FEATURES

The Arcade Parade - Michael Pugliese

Mike Pugliese focuses attention on the new games released at the AMOA, prospects for the future, and a review of Q*BERT from Gottlieb

Game Repair - Jay Hanna

The staff of Antares Game Repair continue their discussion of electronic power supplies from last month and various types of rectification

Photar Industries Blasts Off - Jim Kokoris

Jim Kokoris writes the cover story this month about a new company to the video Game market, Photar Industries, Inc., and the introduction of their appealing new product, MEGADON

What is Computer Language? - Rick Schlueter

Rick Schlueter takes a deep look inside the micro-computer to learn to speak its language and understand its internal processes.

A Postcard Mailing for Promotion  - Carol Kantor

Carol Kantor provides another of her excellent suggestions for the promotion of a small business to generate more sales on a limited budget.

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

Letters

Coming Events

News and Views

The latest news from the businesses involved in the coin machine industry

Classified Advertising

 

VINTAGE COLLECTIBLES

Payout Probabilities, Part 2  - Roger Smith

Roger Smith explains the intricacies of computing the payout of coin drop stimulators with a complex arrangement of pins.

Stolen

Bad news in Chicago

Stim-mania - Bill Whelan

Bill Whelan describes the counter dice games manufactured by Exhibit supply Company including the SELECT-EM, HORSE SHOES, GET-A-PACK and TWINS.

Vending Vignette - Dave Bassitt

Dave Bassitt introduces the Northwestern Ball Gum Merchandiser, a difficult to find model manufactured without a glass globe.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel returns with his popular column, new serial numbers, great photos, and some words of wisdom concerning the history of slot machines.

The Time of Your Life - Russ Jensen

Russ Jensen take a light hearted look at the roles pinball machines have played in the movies, TV and the theatre as props.

Put Another Nickel In - Art Reblitz

Art Reblitz discusses the restoration and conversion of a Peerless Style D Piano with some advice on the subject of conversions

April

1983

Vol. 8, No. 8

COVER

Mr. Stan Harris, a veteran of the industry and founder of Stan Harris and Co., is pictured standing next to a reproduction of the first coin operated machine he purchased and put on location in a barbershop, the Daval ODDBALL.  From that modest beginning, Mr. Harris has built a company and reputation recognized by everyone as a leader in the coin operated industry.  A unique profile of Mr. Harris has been written by his daughter, Sharon Harris, a new member of the company.  Photo compliments of Sharon Harris.

 

FEATURES

It's as easy as "1-2-3" - Rick Schlueter

Rick Schlueter briefly looks at several programs available for the micro-computer that would aid the small business in bookkeeping and accounting.

The Arcade Parade - Michael Pugliese

Mike Pugliese provides a general list and brief review of video games that would be suitable for a new location and comments on the condition of the modern coin op industry.

Stan Harris & Co. - Sharon Harris

Sharon Harris writes a detailed account of the company her father, Stan Harris, spent his life building and the many innovative and trendsetting steps he was the first to take in the industry.

Editor's Statement - Rosanna Harris

Letters

News & Views

Classified Advertising

 

VINTAGE COLLECTIBLES

Vending Vignette - Dave Bassitt

Dave Bassitt features the NEKO, a peanut vendor with an unusual vending mechanism and no glass globe to break.

Jukebox Record - Ray Eklund

Ray Eklund describes Wurlitzer's pre-war speakers and accessories built to compliment their fabulous jukeboxes.  A detailed look at some unusual and rarely seen collectibles worth looking for.

Status of the States

Good news for collectors as a ruling from Alaska's Attorney General's office allows us to color Alaska on the map and put a "YES" column.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Dick Bueschel ponders the possibility of having exhausted the available serial numbers for slot machines.  This month Dick features beautiful photos of many of the collector's favorite machines.

Legislative Update

Read the Attorney General's opinion from Alaska, and the letter that brought the opinion about.  It's sometimes not so difficult to establish the status of collectible slot machines (but not always).

May

1983

Vol. 8, No. 9

EDITOR'S STATEMENT - Rosanna Harris

It seems that I am somewhat like the weather in Colorado almost unpredictableThe change that has come about is not by choiceWe indicated in the April issue that THE COIN SLOT would be taken over by Debi Knight, but the situation has changed and the new owner publisher/editor is a gentleman from Pennsylvania.  Joe Jancuska is not a  stranger to the coin machine industry.  He has been a collector/dealer since the 50'sHe sponsored and ran the first Coin Op Show of Pennsylvania in 1981.

New Editor's Statement

Rosanna, thanks for the introductionYou, Debi Knight, Margaret lozzo, Stephanie Schmidt and the Publication Printers Corp. have done a fine job in bringing THE COIN SLOT to where it's at.  We're sorry to see you leave the action part of THE COIN SLOTGood luck on your new venture.  In accepting the charge, I hope I can do as good a job as you have.  I will endeavor to follow the format established by Les Druyan and refined by John Caler, Bill and Rosanna Harris and Debi Knight.

July

1983

Vol. 8, No. 11

COVER

Two Models of Daval Manufacturing Co. Centasmoke as covered in the Stim-Mania Article.

 

ARTICLES

Letters To the Editor

Flint Reader Sees Gold for Michigan in Flint Journal - David Waymire, Journal Lansing Bureau Flint Journal, Feb. 4,1983

LANSING - Rep. Thomas E. Scott says he thinks Michigan can hit the jackpot by using state owned slot machines to raise big bucks and lower taxes.

News & Views

Industry Trade Associations Meet For Summit: AMOA, AVMDA and AGMA met in Chicago recently to formalize joint project efforts.

Coin Acceptors, Inc. Introduces New Low-Cost Logic Board Tester: Coin Acceptors, Inc., has introduced a new Logic Board Tester that provides instant testing of all components of Coinco's S75-9800B and S75-9800C electronic changer logic boards. Coin Acceptors, Inc ., known by the trade name COINCO, is the world 's leading producer Of coin handling equipment for the Vending and Amusement industries.  The S75-9800 Coin Changer is the world's largest selling electronic changer.

First Industry-Wide "Survival" Seminar: The National Coin Machine Institute, Inc. (NCMI) representing cigarette, music and game operators, is sponsoring the first Annual Industry Survival Seminar, scheduled for June 22 through 24, at the Marriott Hotel in Orlando, Florida.

Exidy's Fax ... The Answer To Who? What? When? Where? & Why?: Exidy introduced their new FAX game at the AOE show in March.  To say the game is a 'HIT' is a mild understatement as the response to the game has far exceeded anticipated levels.  FAX, a time-tested concept of 'question/answer' game captures the popular past time of trivia in a top producing video game.  FAX is a highly competitive game for one player against the clock and even more competitive for two players competing against each other simultaneously.  FAX challenges the quick reflexes of the players on subjects in History, Sports, Entertainment and General Knowledge.

SEGA Increases Production For Congo Bongo (TM): San Diego, California - SEGA Electronics, Inc., has announced a production increase in response to the broad-scale demand for CONGO BONGO, their "hot" new cartoon adventure game.

Putting Mate Golf Machine: Putting Mate of Conyers, Ga., has introduced their Putting Mate, models 100 and 200 which are unique, new, non-repititious, coin-operated golf machines designed for resorts, hotels, clubs, game rooms , golf courses , lounges and anywhere people gather.

Betson Pacific Now Distributes Complete Rowe Line: Betson Pacific has been appointed as a Southern California distributor for the complete line of Rowe phonographs and vending equipment.  "We believe that Rowe offers superior products and the most complete vending and phonograph line available," remarked Peter Betti, "We are pleased to represent such an excellent product line in Southern California."

Editor 's Statement - Joe Jancuska

Problems, Problems, Problems.  The four page interim May issue, even though mailed late, as, by the correspondence, was not received by many.  The people who stated they had not received the May issue was higher than the allowable percentage.  This is a serious problem between The Coin Slot and the Post Office.  In order to resolve this problem I need to know exactly how many did not receive the May issue.  Those that did not, please jot a note on a post card and send it to me ASAP so I can present my case TO the Post Office.  I'll also have a copy of the May issue mailed to those that respond.

Coming Events

Mark these dates on your calendar for future reference and be sure to attend some of these interesting and in formative events coming up in the future.

Legislative Action - Montana & Maryland

Dear Joe,

On May 31 , 1983 Governor Harry Hughes signed into law Senate Bill 666 which alters the definition of an "antique" slot machine to be one which as manufactured 25 year prior to the date on which the machine was seized. It was two years ago that we lobbied thru the original "1941" bill.

Classified Advertising

 

 

ADVERTISER'S INDEX

29: A&P SLOTS

26: Americana AuctioN

31: Antique Slot Machine Part Co.

7: Antique Apparatus Co.

27: Berten & Barrnie

23: Brooks Novelty Antiques

25: Chicago Antique Slot Machine Co.

2: Coin Slot Magazine

15: Colorado 4th Antique Slot Machine Fair

16: Donmar Co.

22: Evans & Frink

14: Harris, Stan

31: Hoke, Inc.

13: Home Arcade Corp.

16: Jamielynn

22: Jukebox Junction, Inc.

36: One Arm Bandit

21: Pall, Allan

32: Slot Closey, The

2: Slot Doctor, The

22: Slot Dynasty

36: St. Louis Slot Machine Co.

35: TAJ Dis. & Co.

20: Yeager, Orin

8: Zygmunt, Frank

FEATURES

J.F. Frantz - Bob Olmstead and Jim Casey

'Beautiful' man slain, mourned by old friend: Chicago Sun-Times, June 16,1983 - Until Tuesday, John T. Frantz, and his friend, Earl Fishman, met each morning to meditate, and then have a friendly little chat.  Sometimes they 'd have breakfast, and then Fishman, 59, would drive Frantz, 76, back to Frantz'  business at 1942 W. Lake.  Their routine of years ended violently this week when Frantz was fatally shot in front of his business, A&F Engineering, as he stood waiting for Fishman to pick him up.

Genesis - Joe Jan

The spirit of contest and gaming is almost as old as mankind.  When two or more individuals with leisure time congregate, contests of wit or skill will occur.  One of the earliest documented cases of gambling can be found in the New Testament when the Roman soldiers cast lots, or played dice, for Christ 's clothing at His crucifixion.  With man 's intellect and ingenuity, games and gambling took on many forms.  And with industrialization games and gambling devices became sophisticated, were commercialized and were manufactured to accommodate the gambling instincts of man.  As the industrial revolution advanced, coin operated vending machines appeared on the market.  In the United States the first coin operated machine, Penny Papers, apparently appeared in 1839 and was based on an English patented device that vended a paper wrapped packet of tobacco. During the middle 1800's various types of coin operated machines were patented and manufactured in Europe.

I'll Have My Computer Call Your Computer -Rick Schlueter

Perhaps the ' most exciting and revolutionary aspect of the microcomputer revolution is telecommunications.  I need all of the UPI news articles about nuclear arms released in the past two months.  I need a list of the most active stocks on the exchange today.  I have a memo to send to each of my branch offices around the country and it has to be there now.  I want the weekly sales reports from each of my branches now.  I want to know all flights leaving Denver this Friday between 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m.  I have a 1000-line program listing I want to send to my brother in California and he needs it in his computer now.  Maybe it sounds like I'm too demanding, but all of these tasks are easily accomplished using mirco-computer communications.  The ones involving information services are attained by communicating with a larger computer.  Communication between two microcomputers is also possible.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Covers Williams AL. Twins Pin Ball Machines  - Baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Coin-Ops.  It seems that baseball has been a major theme for the coin-op industry almost since the beginning of the electric age of coin-ops and it was even in evidence before that time.  One early version which was at the time considered a pinball was the Marval & Baker POP-UP games of the early 1930's (See November 1982 Coin Slot for more on these machines).

Minneapolis Coin Machine Auction - Roger Hilden

The last day of January was cold in Minneapolis, but the people who ventured out were treated to warm bargains at the second arcade game auction here in eight weeks.

 

 

 

VINTAGE COLLECTIBLES

Stim-Mania -Bill Whelan

Look familiar?  It should, because back in the November, 1981 , issue of The Coin Slot, I pictured and described all of the variations of the Daval Manufacturing Company's CHICAGO CLUB HOUSE, which was one of the most popular of all the counter machines introduced in 1932.  It stayed at the top of the popularity list for some years afterward.  So popular, in fact, that three more years down the line, in 1935, they made another smaller three reel version using the same design theme of the earlier CHICAGO CLUB HOUSE.  Not only did they use the same design, but they used the same left and right side panel castings.  This machine was the CENT-A-SMOKE, and was first introduced in early 1935 at a price of only $12.50.  If you wanted it with a take-in register and double back doors that would be a big $2.00 extra.

The Token Corner - Stephen Alpert

A few of the early slot machine manufacturers placed their monogram (consisting of the initials of their name) on their tokens.  Apparently these monograms were like trademarks, widely recognized at the time (75 to 85 years ago) within the coin machine industry.  The Caille Brothers, who made ornate machines, also put out ornate tokens, many of which have monograms.  The Caille Co. (of Detroit, 1897 to 1901) put their monogram consisting of the letters TCCo on many of their tokens .  The Caille Brothers Co. (1901 to 1938) used a CBCo monogram on their Silver Cup slot machine tokens.  There are about a dozen varieties of this token, most of which have differently shaped monograms.

Northwestern 33 - Dave Bassitt

With the Northwestern Model 33, we make our bow in the low price vending machine field . As the model indicates, thirty-three (33), this machine was formally introduced in 1933 and by today's standards is very affordable and very collectable.  Also, I might add, this is one machine that has been increasing rapidly in value.  A real sleeper in my opinion.  There are four different colors, however I have only seen three colors. The most common color is light green, and followed by orange and light yellow.  In my opinion the rare color is yellow.  Always, look at the flap to make sure the name Northwestern is inscribed on the metal.  If you don 't see this information on the flaps, most likely the flap is not original and someone has substituted another flap that looks satisfactory but does not belong on the machine.

Reflections - Fred Ryan

Fred Ryan photos of Confectionary/Smoke Shops with "The Bicycle" and an "Ad-Le E-Z" Gumball Machine

February

1984

Vol. 9, No. 4

COVER

Pok-O-Reel and Royal Reels as in Bill Whelan's "Stim-Mania" article.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Coming Events

Letter To The Editor

Tribute To A Coin Machine Great - Russ Jensen

One of the true pioneers of the coin machine industry, Mr. Harry E. Williams, has succumbed to cancer.  Harry passed away on Sept. 12, 1983 in Palm Springs, California.  This is certainly a great loss to the world of coin operated amusement.  Mr. Williams was a part of this great industry for over fifty years, from the late 1920's until the time of his death.

News & Views

Coin Acceptors, Inc. Makes Its Video "Salute to Vending": As part of a year-long 25th Anniversary celebration, Coin Acceptors, Inc. (COINCO), will make available for use to all NAMA Members the video show, "Salute To Vending,"  starring Ed McMahon.  "Salute To Vending," which premiered at the 1983 NAMA Convention in Chicago, is available free of charge for local, non-broadcast showings.

Control Theft and Vandalism: An especially cost effective way to control theft and vandalism, using the original "TamPruf" (r) fasteners wherever regular fasteners are used, was announced by Burleigh Industries, 48-51 36st Street, Long Island City, NY 11101.  The "TamPruf"(r) fasteners - bolts, screws, and nuts may be used to fasten computers to their stands, typewriters, calculators or any portable office equipment, motors, panels, plastic sheeting - in fact, anything that can be or should be fastened down.  The simple but extremely theft resistant fasteners are put into position with a special wrench-type tool.  Use of the special tool permits engaging or disengaging the special head of the fasteners.  No one without this special wrench can remove the fasteners.

Australian Firm Hopes to Rock U.S. with Video Juke Box: An Australian firm hopes to capitalize on the popularity of music videos and seeks U.S. distributors for its video juke boxes.  Audio Visual Engineering of Blackwood, South Australia, anticipates selecting firms which are willing to at least partially assemble or manufacture the machines locally in the future, according to AVE representative Geoff Ellery.

The Broder Logic Trainer by L.J. Broder Enterprises: The Broder Logic Trainer™ Model 100 is a unique device for fast and straightforward learning of digital circuits.  No prior training is required.  Read the self-paced manual and become familiar with several digital components.  Solve the applicable trainer problems for retention and understanding.  Then repeat this process with additional devices.  No IC or wire manipulation required.  Boolean Algebra (a design aid) is not part of the basic course.  Used for testing, training, and upgrading the performance of troubleshooters .

National Collectibles Exposition: Collectors and dealers attending the National Collectibles Exposition first show on the west coast were well satisfied with the variety and quality of offerings on the floor.  Unseasonably high temperatures and humidity gripped the resort town of San Diego and probably could be blamed for keeping the attendance below that which was expected.

Prevex Polymer Solves Cracking Problems for Coin Acceptors: Prevex engineering polymer from Borg-Warner Chemicals has dramatically reduced rejects in an automatic coin sensing device made by Coin Acceptors, Inc. of St. Louis, Mo.

Serial Number Update- Dick Bueschel

It certainly is nice to see The Coin Slot back on the track again.  Just as serials were beginning to pile in once again The Coin Slot had its crisis.  I faced the awkward fact of having an armful of great stuff, serials and pictures with no place to put them.

Automatic Auction Report

A sparse crowd met at the Automatic Service Co. Warehouse, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., for a Nevius Auction Service Auction on Saturday, November 26.  Starting at 11 a.m. sharp, after over an hour of inspection, the sale was over in record time.  Several machines had to be withdrawn because of not reaching the reserve on that lot.  Needless to say, there were many super buys, happy customers, and a disappointed seller.

Book Reviews - Dick Evans

SLOT MACHINES, by Marshall Fey. 240 pages, 400 photos (218 in full color). Price $29.50 plus $1 .75 postage.  Order from Liberty Belle Books, 4250 S. Virginia, Reno, Nevada 89502.

A slot machine book reviewer has not had much to get excited about the past couple of years, but Marshall Fey has changed all that.  Yes, books have been published on the subject in recent months, but the last real "earth-shaker" was Bob Geddes' and Dan Mead's SLOT MACHINES ON PARADE in 1980. In my humble opinion, Marshall has topped Bob and Dan's work, and this is really saying something!

 

SLOT MACHINES by Marshall Fey Another super book. 240 - 9x 12 glossy pages with over 400 illustrations in hard cover.  Marshall fills in some gaps on the unfolding story of the slot machine.  He answers the question of when his grandfather Charles invented the Liberty Bell, the first 3-reel slot machine and also tells us about side issues involving the Frisco Quake, his father 's relation to the coin-op business, other manufacturers, and takes us from the Gay 10's to the Roaring 20's, Depression, Golden Age of slots, up to the video slots.  Includes mathematics, statistics, collecting and restoring. A great buy for $29.50 plus $1 .75 postage and handling.

 

SLOT MACHINE REPAIR MANUAL Published by Silver State Pub. Co. A good highly technical book on the modern slot. Has 64 - 8 1/2 x 11 black and white pages with many diagrams and illustrations.  Covers general information, circuits, adjustment, alignment and troubleshooting. Not for the light reader.  A good buy for $14.95 postage and handling included.

 

KOVEL'S ORGANIZER FOR COLLECTORS by Ralph and Terry Kovel 224 - 6 x 8 1/4 pages with hard cover for listing antiques or collectibles.  Each page has a listing for pertinent information along with a place for a photo.  It is what it says, an organizer.  Good for the collector or dealer with many items.  Keeps the information in one handy book. $14.95 plus $1 .00 postage and handling.

 

KOVEL'S ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES PRICE LIST 10th Edition by Ralph and Terry Kovel Over 800 - 5 1/4 x 8 1/8 black and white pages softbound with over 500 photos and illustrations with 75 color plates.  Has prices for over 45,000 items.  This guide for the professionals, dealers and collectors, is a good general guide, but the coin operated machine section can get the novice into trouble, some misidentified items.  Good reference guide. $9.95 plus $1 .00 postage and handling.

 

WARMAN'S ANTIQUES & THEIR PRICES 17th Edition Edited by Harry L. Rinker Published by Warman Pub. Co. Inc. 700 - 5 1/4 x 6 3/4 black and white pages softbound with over 1000 photos and illustrations.  Lists 50,000 items with prices and is also for the professionals, dealers and collectors.  This general guide, also like the Kovel's, has a coin operated items section that can get a novice into trouble because of some misidentified items.  A good reference for $10.95 plus $1 .50 postage and handling.

SCHROEDER ANTIQUES PRICE GUIDE 2nd Edition Edited by Sharon and Bob Huxford Over 600 - 8 1/2 x 11 black and white pages softbound with pictures and illustrations.  Lists over 57,000 items with prices.  This general guide, like Warman's and Kovel's, has items misidentified in the coin operated machine section, but otherwise is a good general reference for the professionals, dealers and collectors.  $9.95 plus $1 .00 postage and handling.  All of the above books can be purchased at TAJ Distributing & Supply, Jackson St., on the line, Luzerne, PA 18709.

Editor's Statement

Confusions!!! In our effort to keep The Coin Slot afloat, several things happened.  Some by choice, and others not.

Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

United ABC Bingo: N6, G6, G4, N3, B2, G5, 03, BINGO.  The last stronghold of legal gambling in many states where gambling is not legal.  The savior of the ever popular non-profit organizations.  A game so simple that a 5 year old can play and understand it and yet popular enough for many non-profit organizations to use it for a good percent of their revenue.  Knowing the coin-op people are always looking for a good thing it was a natural for them to start making their own versions of the ever popular bingo game.  In most cases I have seen the bingo games use a pinball format with a flat playfield where the balls would land and light up the corresponding numbers on the cards pictured on the back glass of the machine. Someone always has to be different and United was the one.

Skippack Auction Report

The Sunday after Thanksgiving was in the cool 40's, but it didn't stop the few hundred potential buyers from congregating in the pleasant Skippack House.  The Geyer-Girvin Auction moved briskly after a prompt start at noon following an hour inspection.  Since no immediate auctions were in the offing, it was suggested that interested parties contact Geyer-Girvin Auction Co. Inc., Suite 102, West Germantown Pike, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462. 215-834-1854.

American Jukebox Facing Troubled Times

During the last four years, the jukebox industry has come upon troubled times.

Stim·Mania- Bill Whelan

Groetchen "Pok-O-Reel" All Models Including" Royal Reels" - An A.B.T. Revamp

It was the " Pok-O-Reel," manufactured by the Groetchen Tool Co. of Chicago, ILL. in 1933 that supposedly made a comeback for the older 5 reel poker machines and started the trend of fancy Art-Deco aluminum cased poker machines with gumball venders.  So it was stated in an old advertisement that I had read.  This to me seems very unlikely, as the Daval "Chicago Club House" which also started life as a 5 reel poker machine was first manufactured in late 1932, and it wasn't until almost a year later in November of 1933 the "Pok-O-Reel " hit the market with a bang.

Take Stock In Your Hobby

As mentioned in the January 1984 issue of "The Coin Slot" Editor's Statement, the crisis of '83 that lead to the program "Take Stock in Your Hobby" to keep "The Coin Slot" from being a thing of the past, was a success.  Not a whoop hollerin' success, but never the less, a success.  Living proof are the October 1983 and January 1984 issues, and this issue of TCS.  Thanks again to those who cared.  We are still a little weak but we are alive and we are asking that you keep up your continued support by keeping the subscriptions and advertisements coming in.  During the crisis we had over 40 subscriptions on hold.  Now that we are alive, they are part of the fold.

Siren, Wisc. Auction Report - Roger Hilden

Siren is a sleepy little resort town of about 900 people in northern Wisconsin, known for good fishing and Leinenkugels. (If you don't know what Leinenkugels is, you haven 't lived).  Siren is probably one of the few places left on earth where they still roll up the sidewalks at 10 p.m., except, of course, in front of the local VFW.

Reflections - Fred Ryan

This months brace of photographs feature Sports of another day proposing toasts with small beers.  Hardy fellows they. Indeed, their playthings were rather sturdy also. In the top image, lashed to floor and wall , we may see cast iron devices made to be punched, pulled, squeezed, even kicked.  The punching machine along the wall appears to be the right height that an especially rigorous patron might try to measure the velocity of a head butt.

Coin Slot Award

As mentioned in the August/September issue of The Coin Slot, nominees for the Tenth Annual Coin Slot Award were accepted until February.  To date nine nominees have been submitted.

Classifieds

 

 

 

ADVERTISER'S INDEX

13: A&A Antique Slot Machine Lock & Key Specialists

5: Antique Slot Machine Parts Co.

12: A&P Slots

24: Bernie Berten

41: Brooks Novelty

9: Chicago Antique Slot Machine Co.

29: Coin Slot Books

7: Evans & Frink

21: Gronowski, Steve

18: Harris, Stan

26: Hoke, Inc.

Back Cover: Home Amusement Co.

4: House of Stuart

28: Jamie Lynn

6: Marshall Fey

35: One Arm Bandit

33: Pall, Allan

2: Retonio/Victorian Casino Antiques

32: Royal Bell, Ltd.

36: Ruma's Deli

11: Slot Closet, The

31: Slot Dynasty

10: SI. Louis Slot Machine Co.

23: Witherell Americana Auction

43: TAJ Dis. & Co.

30: Zygmunt, Frank

Fall

1984

Vol. 1, No. 1

COVER

The Caille ROULETTE

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates and Dealines

Notes From Nic - Nic Costa

The Collection of Automatic Machines at Watermouth Castle - The 1869 edition of Wright's Dictionary of Obsolete and Provincial English defines the word 'groche' as a verb, meaning 'to grumble.'  this obscure little word is surprisingly very much still in use, as I discovered on a recent visit to Watermouth Castle in North Devon.  There (particularly amongst the present occupants of the castle) the work is very much to the fore.  Time has, however, transposed its meaning, the verb 'groche' (pronounced grokel).  It is frequently used, sometimes with reverence, sometimes with disdain, to describe what at times must appear to the uninitiated a master race.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

The Coin Slot has a whole new look and that's exciting.  Equally exciting is the retention of the things we know and like, plus more.  Publisher Don Hoflin and editor Cindy Kerstiens are dedicated to a quality publication dealing with vintage machines and collectibles.

As I See It - Rosanna Harris

Spring si usually the time of new beginnings, but it is very fitting that The Coin Slot should find its rejuvenation in the Fall.  It was September when Les Druyan started the then "newsletter" and it was also in November that we added the color cover so desired by our loyal readers.  Now Don and his very capable staff will launch The Coin Slot into a brand new era of growth.

5 Balls 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

Articles describing interesting early pingames was what I had planned to include, from time to time, when I first started writing pinball articles for The Coin Slot.  To date, however, I have only published one such aritcle (back in November 1981) describing Genco's METRO, so I think another article of that type is long overdue.

Stim-Mania - Bill Whelen

This is a follow-up of the Daval mfg. Co. serials which appeared in the October 1982 issue of The Coin Slot.  Besides machines in the author's collection, the following persons also contributed to this update: LeVerne Alm, Phillip Baird, George Chard, Charles Deibel, Jack Freund, Jim Gregovich, Thomas Mirando, Jim Poe, Karl Rider, Rick Rohan, Jim Suber, Phillip H. Thornton IV, M.D. Wells, Craig Willardson.  These are also a few serial taken from a list received from Dick Bueschel and it is not known to me who sent them to Dick.

Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Flying!  That hidden urge to soar like the birds.  A feeling that people can only dream about.  It was probably on of these dreamers who came up with the idea for the HELICOPTER TRAINER.  Although I have been unable to date this machine, its style lends itself to the 1960's period.  If you remember or even if you wish not to remember, the Vietnam conflict was probably the greatest shoe to date of the versatility of the helicopter.  This new interest in the helicopter, with its constnt televised coverage was, I am sure, a great deciding factor in the creation of this machine.

Coin Slot Centerfold - The Caille ROULETTE

The Caille ROULETTE victorian floor machine is considered by the vast majority of coin-op gambling machine collectors to the the "Coup-de-gras" of all floor machines.  Most all collectors that have one of these in their possession have nothing but praise for the overall beauty of the quarter sawn octagon shaped cabinet with elaborate castings and especially well designed, strong, and smooth running mechanism.  There are two variations of this machine.  ROULETTES  of 1904 were 7 way with a 60 pocket wheel. There was also a 7 way with an 80 pocket wheel that was produced shortly there after, but the production did not last very long as they were notorious for having some out of the ordinary mechanical problems.  In 1907 another version was produced as the Caille PEERLESS.  The PEERLESS model had fancier trim on all beveled panels and corners of the cabinet and the lid had a stepped and flared edge rather than being plain round.  The only other difference is in the large front casting which says "The Caille PEERLESS" instead of "The Caille ROULETTE" as on the first models.

Coin Slot People - Richard M. Bueschel - Cynthia Kersteins

This interview was conducted in the Northbrook Illinois office of Richard M. Bueschel on July 20, 1984 by Cynthia Kerstiens.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Coin Device Museum - Carroll E. Vetterick

Prominent Chicagoan to Preserve Old-Time Coin Machines; Industry Leaders Cooperate - What promises to be the world's largest and finest collection of historic coin-operated machines is the Chicago Coin Device Museum, founded several months ago by Alden Scott Boyer, President of Boyer Laboratories of Chicago and Paris.  The museum will be located in the Boyer Building at 2700 S. Wabash Avenue in Chicago, just two blocks form the "Automatic Age" offices, and will be ready for inspection by coin machine men and by the general public within the next month or two.

The Bet - Ed Smith

The time was the early thirties.  The coin-op business had never been better.  Slot were going strong, and counter games were appearing in more locations.  Almost every small shop on Chicago's West Sid was cranking out cabinets, coin shutes and other parts, both for themselves and for Mills, Watling, Jennings and A.B.T.  There was enough business to go around, and everybody helped everyone else.

D.C. Coin-Op Show - Kenneth Durham

The 1984 East Coast Coin-Op Show and sales was part of the World's Fair of Collectibles, held at the new convention center in downtown Washington, D.C. on June 9 and 10.  Ten coin-op dealers joined over 400 dealers specializing in advertising, toys and dolls.  The coin-op show brought together more coin-op dealers on the East Coast than ever before.

Finding The Fey LIBERTY BELL - Gord Nichol

This is a true story.  Even the names have been retained to reveal the innocent.  Stupidity is the star with Greed and Avarice the co-star.  Good old "G" and "A" took second billing on this one because Stupidity was clearly front and center.

Lawsuit - Kim Cobb

Club Owner Sues to Halt Seizing of Slot Machines - The owner of a Las Vegas-style Houston nightclub is in court for the second time in little more than three months, this time aiming her complaints at Houston-area law enforcement.

Americana Auction Reveiw  - Bill Whelen

Americana Auction Witherell Enterprises, September 3 and 4, 1983, San Francisco, California - The following coverage of the last two Witherell Auctions are being presented here together a bit behind times due to the fact that there was a temporary slow down in The Coin Slot and also, more important, the neglect on the part of the author to put this all together.

Reflections

"B.C." - Cynthia L. Kerstiens

I remember when... Terminals were places you met buses or planes; "Disc" was an album or cause of back pains.  Floppy was a hat brim, difficult was hard; Daisy was a flower that grew in the yard.  "Bits" were clenched between horses' teeth; and "final quit" was cause for a funeral wreath!

Books

Jukeboxes And Other Nice Things 1934 - 1974 by Frank Adams, Printed by AMR Publishing Co. - This quality book of 240 pages ahs photos of all Wurlitzer jukeboxes during this long era of American production.  Descriptions, remote equipment, news articles from the era, lists of the other jukebox manufactures showing year manufactured, number of selections played, model numbers etc.  Several lists of the outstanding song hits for various years, news articles, ads and much more.  Excellent reference source for looking up data on Wurlitzer and other jukebox manufactures.  8 1/2 by 11.  Deluxe Edition (R-232) $27.50, Paperback Economy Edition (R232E) $17.50.

 

Volume II - More On Before '71 And Those That Came After by Frank Adams, Printed by AMR Publishing Co. - Several photos of different models are printed in full color, including early models such as 1015, 1080, 750, 780, 850, 81 and others.  The description of each model produced after 1974 is printed in four languages, English, French, German and Spanish.  Much  other related information of interest is in Volume II.  160 pages of excellence.  Printed on 100 pound enamel stock. 8 1/2 by 11 inches.  Deluxe Edition (R-295) $27.50.

 

 

 

ADVERTISERS

42: Alman Enterprises Inc.

7: A.M.R. Publishing Co.

13, Inside Back Cover: Antique Apparatus Co.

53: Antique Slot Machine Parts Co.

11: Berten

23: Chicagoland

78: Classifieds

47: Coin-Op Amusement Co.

80: Collectors' Directory

34: Evans and Frink

Outside Back Cover: Home Amusement Co.

34: Home Arcade Corp.

47: Illinois Antique Slot Machine Co.

79: Liberty Belle

1: Royal Bell Ltd.

13: Ruma's Deli

2: Russo

Inside Front Cover: Sax

79: Slot Dynasty

26,27: Star Warehouse

34: St. Louis Slot Machine Co.

15: The Aardvark

42: Waters

53: Yeager

Spring 1986 Vol. 2, No. 3

COVER

Device Manufacturers, Inc. HISKOR - see Centerfold story pages 48-54.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Tips & Techniques  - J. Frahm

This regular feature of THE COIN SLOT is to promote the exchange of ideas to help with the finding and fixing of vintage coin-op equipment.  Unique problems encountered by readers are discussed, and tips sent in will be shared with other collectors.  If you have a special problem or a technique you would like to share, write: Jeff Frahm, c/o THE COIN SLOT, or at St. Louis Slot Machine Co., 2111 S Brentwood Blvd., St. Louis. Missouri 63144.

Jukebox Record - R. Eklund, Jr.

We have, at some time, heard some of the familiar quips reported when buying a jukebox.  Most of my new finds are from individuals and I constantly hear new approaches.  The new collector in mind, I will introduce you to some of the standard quips encountered while making those jukebox deals.

Under My Table - J. Vojacek

What's appealing about collecting antique coin machines?  Ask this question of collectors and you'll get a variety of answers.  One way of approaching an answer is to look at the different kinds of collectors as well as at their goal in collecting, and for the purpose of this article I would like to look at three kinds of collectors: what I call the "series" collector, the "reconstructive" collector, and the "artistic" collector.

From My Vantage Point - R. Harris

Ever since last summer there has been a little nagging voice inside my head saying why are we not doing more to bring our state laws into more realistic terms in regard to private ownership of slot machines.  Why must we be forced to the point of nearly losing what has been so hard to come by before we have our eyes suddenly forced to open?  The answer is not a difficult one.  All of us, or at least most of us, can become very comfortable with the way things are and we're content to just let the rest of the world pass by.  It's not always been like that and it doesn't have to be that way now.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

The update is back after a one issue hiatus.  Did you miss it in the last issue?  So did I. It happened for a number of reasons, most of which were tied to a booming economy and a burgeoning interest in vintage coin -ops.  The booming economy part meant that a lot of people, myself included, were faced with a greater work load than had been faced in a couple of years.  The burgeoning part is a function of the economy.  For the first time in some time, things look good and collectors of all kinds once again have some disposable income.  And that means acquisitions.  You could see it at the Chicagoland Show in November, and it has held up past the first of the year.

Fantastic Finds - Ed Smith

"Fantastic Finds" is a new feature of  The Coin Slot.  We invite you to send in your stories about finds or even goose chases that you have experienced.  Send your stories to "Fantastic Finds," c/o Ed Smith, Box 277, Pecatonica, Illinois 61063.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olsen

I've always been fascinated by the old viewing machines, especially the stereoscopes and mutoscopes of the early 1900's.  The Exhibit PHOTOSCOPE is like a dream come true for people like me.  In one machine they have combined stereoscope pictures with the action of a mutoscope and you don't even have to turn a crank to watch.  Let's take a closer look.

5 Balls 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

A major "first" in the world of pinball collecting/enthusiasm occurred on the weekend of November 22-24, 1985 at the Holiday Inn O'Hare/Kennedy in Rosemont, Illinois.  It was a fantastic event, dubbed "Pinball Expo '85: and ~ appears that it was the first of more such events to come.

Colorado Calling - R. Hector

It is possible to make a silk purse out of that sow's ear under your workbench.  Let me explain.  Do you have a broken VEST POCKET, or have you ever seen a broken one at a show or auction?  If so, chances are it is probably the shoulder bolt on the coin slide that is broken.  For years we always thought that that was the end of a perfectly good machine.  Also, let me add that a VEST POCKET can really be a great machine when operating properly, and a must for a true slot machine collector.

DK's Pinball Kaleidoscope - Dan Kramer

Welcome back to the wonderful world of pinball!  I've spent the past three months basking in the afterglow of Pinball Expo '85 and am already envisioning the next one.  For the true pin aficionado, there's nothing like it anywhere else on this planet.  Plans for this year's edition are already in progress!  If you would like information on P.E. '86, drop a line to Rob Berk, 2671 Youngstown Rd. S.E., Warren, Ohio 44484.

Coin Slot's Centerfold Device Manufacturers, Inc. HI-SKOR

Wouldn't it be nice to hear about a machine that DIDN'T get away for a change?  It seems that collectors are so quick to recount the stories about how machines were missed by 15 minutes or by 5 dollars.  While it's all too true that hose things happen, this time let's dwell on a happier note.

Stim-Mania - Bill Whelan

The Daval Mfg. Co. is one of a very few manufacturers of trade stimulators that serial numbered all of the machines in the line.  The "Chicago Club House" and "Daval Gum Vendor" were the two first models produced.  To date the lowest serial on file is for a "Chicago Club House" having No. 102. Approximately the first 12,000 machines were produced in no particular sequence as the serials are all intermingled.  After the 12,000 mark more of the models seemed to be coming off the assembly line in larger groups with the "Marvel," "American Eagle" and "Penny Pack" dominating the run well into the 63,000 serials.  From 64,000 up into the 90,000 area was mostly held by the "Buddy" and the "Free Play."  Most of the "Free Play" serials are from 65,000 to 70,000 range.  The highest serial on file is for a "Bell Slide" having No. 97,002.  This seems like an awfully high number for this model as most were in the 5,000 range.  There are many "Ace" and "Cub" models that have shown up without a serial number and only showing a single letter, most of which have had an A, B, C, D or E.

Coin Slot People - Cynthia L. Kerstiens

This interview was conducted at the home of Mike Gorski in July 1985 by Cynthia L. Kerstiens.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Book Review - I. Nelson Rose

Gambling and the Law, I. Nelson Rose, Professor Of Law (Submitted by L. J. Waters) A hardbound book. 306 pages. Graphs. 14 illustrations of actual tax forms.  The most important book on gambling and gaming that has been published in four decades!

New Booklet - R. Eklund, Jr.

"Guide to 50's and 60's Jukeboxes" by Olle Dahlback (Ornskoldsvik, Sweden).  Available from: Fred Bingman, 810 Courtland Drive, Manchester, Missouri 63021. Price, $9 postpaid.

A Dirty Story - T. Gustwiller

My story starts in the summer of 1985, when I purchased a Mills PILOT from another collector.  (Rubin's Book, Page 44) We made a deal on the phone and agreed it would be sent UPS because of the 75-pound maximum weight limit.  He sent it in three different boxes which arrived on three separate days.  The mechanism came first, part of the castings next, and finally, after five days, the last package came with the balance of the castings, award cards and screws.

The "Philly" Show - M. Keiser

The First Annual Philadelphia Antique Jukebox, Slot Machine and Advertising Show and Sale, held at the George Washington Lodge Convention Hall in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, was a spectacular success.  Dealers and collectors from all major areas of the United States were represented.  The three major manufacturers of reproduction antique jukeboxes, two from California and one from Chicago, attended as well as forty other important dealers from the East Coast, Midwest and the South, making this first time three-day event an instant success.

"Mystery Answers" - B. Whelan

Corrections and Answers to Machine Photos In the Winter '85·'86 Issue of The Coin Slot.  CORRECTIONS: Page 36 (top left) - The Caille floor machine is an ECLIPSE not a CENTAUR.  The wrong nameplate is on the cabinet just above the wheel.  This has happened to many Caille floor machines that I have seen over the years.  It seems that during some restorations, whichever nameplate was handiest got slapped on the case.  The most common of all the name swaps is the one shown here.  The wheels on the two machines are identical, but the things to look for are the ECLIPSE has a standard payout cup and the CENTAUR has a jackpot with the payout cup below and also has a coin box on the inside floor of the case with a cast frame and access door on the lower right side of the cabinet.  The twin CENTAUR will have a door on both sides.  The ECLIPSE just has the standard coin bag hanging on the mechanism.

Chicago Slot & Advertising Show - Ray Eklund, Jr.

It was a disappointing show for a former slot machine collector.  Slot machine dealers grasped for a new low this time with vast numbers of electronic type machines, and armies of English slots.  Reproduction slots abounded, and the majority were unmarked.  Damaged castings, hack-jobs and just pure clunkers were in the majority.  Several dealers offered only top quality and authentic machines, but I became highly suspicious of anybody selling restored machines.  I was heeding the "buyer beware" attitude, and eventually did not purchase a single slot machine.

Pace: The Untold Story - Part II - L.J. "Jim" Waters

We began our story PACE: The Untold Story, in the Fall 1985 issue of The Coin Slot.  In this, Part II, we shall discuss and show those machines sold by the company during the years 1933 through 1950, having previously covered the earlier Operator Bell machines.

 

 

 

ADVERTISERS

35: Back Numbers

Inside Back: Berten

2: Brown

94: Classified Ads

95: Collectors' Directory

93: Greater Baltimore Collectors Mart II

65: Evans and Frink

25: l. J. Waters

13: Mechanical Marvels

25: Orange Trading Co.

2: Philadelphia Show & Sale

58: Pratt

7: Royal Bell, ltd.

56: Ruma's Deli

Inside Front: Sax

13: Slot Dynasty

1: St. Louis Slot Machine Company

Outside Back: Zygmunt

56: Zygmunt

Fall

1987

 

COVER

Caille BON-TON.  See Centerfold Story by Bill Whelan on page 40.

 

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

From My Vantage Point - Rosanna Harris

Information on Texas law - H.B. 359 - Gaming Devices, Antique Effective 9/1/87

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

Bally's BIKINI - It's "OK"  If the question were asked, "What type of electro-mechanical pin game had the most complicated circuitry?" the answer would most certainly be the in-line or bingo pinball.  Of these games the most complicated variety would be those known by bingo pinball aficionados as the OK games.

Colorado Calling - Rick Hector

The Mills QT is one of the nicest and best operating slot machines around, but it can be an insomniac's nightmare to restore or perform major repairs.

Stim-Mania - Bill Whelan

On Tuesday, August 25, 1987, the firm of Butterfield & Butterfield of San Francisco, California, hosted an auction of items from the estate of the late Charles Smallwood.

DK's Pinball Kaleidoscope - D. Kramer

Kaleidoscope Presents The Token Gesture in Pinball - Rewards granted by pinball machines have taken on many guises during pinball's half-century of public enjoyment.  Unfortunately, this has led to bad stigmas and a spotted past in many regions of the United States.  The first few years of coin-operated production in the 1930's saw numerous manufactures of slot machines jumping onto the pinwagon (See Russ Jensen's article in the last Coin Slot on pin games and gambling).  This resulted in a wide variety of games which dispensed coins as rewards for skillful play (of course, a little luck helps also).  Many other new manufacturers of pinballs followed suit to stay in competition.

Coin Slot's Centerfold: Caille BON-TON

The story of this rare machine all began in the spring of 1984 when Ed Smith, Illinois collector, stopped for fuel at his local fill-em-up spot and in talking old slots with the attendant, found out that the owner of the station knew of an elderly lady that was selling her house.  He remembered the lady having an old machine in the house.  So, with that, there was a cloud of smoke left from a 40-foot stripe of Goodyear rubber out the driveway in the direction of the lady's house.  Not even knowing what great treasure he had come upon, a purchase was made and home it went.

Fantastic Finds - Ed Smith

Dear Readers, We need your stories.  They don't need to be original finds.  A find at a flea market, or even the slot show counts.  any time you add to your collection, it is a find.  Just being in the right place at the right time can be an exciting event to a serious collector.

Bubble Gum Alley - R. Smith

The Honor Box

As ubiquitous as vending is in our culture, it has not always been so and even today, it is not as common in other parts of the world.  For vending to develop and flourish, several factors must be present: 1) The general population must be sufficiently affluent that they have discretionary funds.  (That is, a fair number of people must have a little "loose change" that may be spent on nonessential, impulse-type purchases.)  2) There must be a stable and uniform coinage upon which to base the mechanical vendor, and 3) the vendor must have a product that is widely recognized, has a stable shelf life and is generally purchased in a manageable quantity for a small price, such as a single coin.  Products like gumballs, breath pellets and peanuts are good examples of products that meet these needs.  It is relatively easy to understand why vending wasn't seen in colonial America or in today's developing countries.  Similarly, the unstable coinage of the Roman Empire or Feudal English kings deprived the leisure class of the convenience of street corner vending.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

So here I sit at my desk, shuffling papers, hoping for enough for a Serial Number Update, having a few pictures and letters from Fred Sagebaum of Butte, Montana, and Dan Thompson of Duluth, Minnesota, and wondering if that'll do the job, and the mailman comes.  Actually, he came over a period of three weeks and filled my desk.

Pingames - David Haynes

Slick Chick - D. Gottlieb Co. 1963:

I saw my first SLICK CHICK at a garage sale in Santa Rosa.  I didn't pay a lot of attention to it because it was too expensive and at the time I was more interested in the Bally AIR ACES sitting alongside.

Status of the States

Coin Slot People - Steve Squires

The Coin Slot Talks With Steve Squires SQUIRES AND CORRIE San Mateo, California

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Charitable Gambling - R. Whereatt

Of every $100 spent on charitable gambling in Minnesota last year, $11.50 went to the charities the gambling helps to support, according to the Minnesota Charitable Gambling Control Board's last report.

Montana Gaming - D. Harper

Video draw poker has been legal in Montana for over two years, but not until this summer have players here been offered a casino-style machine.

Sicking - Tom Gustwiller

Sicking was established on Freeman Avenue in Cincinnati, Ohio by Barney Sicking.  Barney was born in 1861 and in the grocery business for many years.  One day in 1895, someone put a coin device on his counter.  He was so impressed with it, he started in the business.

Illegal Gambling Devices - Pat Prince

The chief prosecutor in Minnesota said Thursday that video poker and blackjack machines at the Fond Du Luth Gaming Casino in Duluth, Minnesota, are probably illegal.

Anti-Cheating Devices - Rick Hector

Once upon a time, I was shown a Mills Owl which had been altered by some old-time operator so as to siphon off every coin which was bet on the black.  The purpose of this was to cheat the location owner on his "cut" of the machine's take.  This was accomplished by the addition of a coin tube from where the coins first enter the machine.  Such a device as this would probably increase the revenues of the slot machine operator by as much as 20%.

Zeke Wolf - W.J. Helmer

One of the few survivors of the '50's reform era is Auto-Bell Manufacturing, housed in an industrial one-story building on Chicago's Northwest Side.  The company is owned by Zeke Wolf, a portly, mustached gentleman of 61 who looks like an old-time burgomaster.

Pinballs - Shelle Gilgoff

The Pinball Machine - A Brief History: From the moment the plunger hits the ball and the bells start ringing you enter the strange and awesome world of pinball.  You are transported from here to there and until the last ball leaves the playfield you are totally captivated by the mysterious world surrounding the game.

The Daval Electric Eagle - Stan Jankowski

The Daval "ELECTRIC EAGLE" Conversion Part I: Sometimes the spinning of ordinary trade stimulator reels and resulting simple token payout can seem mundane and unexciting to a seasoned collector.  It must have been just such a jaded, thrill-seeker that was responsible for inventing the original Daval "ELECTRIC EAGLE' conversion.

More Casinos On Line - C. Pearce

Megabucks Network Keeps Growing: More Casinos Go On-Line

Megabucks continues to grow rapidly.  Within the last six months, six  more Nevada casinos have joined the cooperative progressive slot machine network, bringing the number of casinos offering the super jackpot to 35.

Collectibles

A-1 Casino Collectibles Offers Antique Slots and Jukeboxes - Las Vegas residents and visitors can now enjoy Nevada-style fun in their own homes, thanks to A-1 Casino Collectables, a new retail store specializing in antique slot machines and classic jukeboxes.

Spring

1988

Vol. 4, No. 3

ON THE COVER

Mills 1927 OPERATOR BELL ("Bullseye"), 25˘ play, serial 160,716.  Contributed by Dick Bueschel.  See page 27.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Bubble Gum Alley - R. Smith

As any collector of coin-op machines knows, there are many instances of similarity between different machines.  Similarities can lead to confusion in correctly identifying a machine, or may aid in establishing the time in which a machine was made or used.  Sometimes the similarities were intentional, as in the "White Base" machines from Hance.  These were intended to be part of a line of products from a single manufacturer.  Some manufacturers made machines under different labels for various distributors, leading to minor variations like those seen with the "Kemaco," "Pix." and "Lion" vendors.

From My Vantage Point - R. Harris

Recently we received a copy of the official map prepared by the Gaming Commission in Nevada.  They prepared the map after contacting each state and ascertaining what the current law stated.  However, if the state agency didn't respond, then the conclusion was that nothing was allowed.  This being the case there appears to be several errors on the Nevada map.  As you can see Washington state shows that nothing is allowed.  While, in fact, we have a copy of the law stating that Washington is now 25 years or older.  We went through considerable trouble to get the copy of the law from Washington.  A friend finally went to the capital and obtained a copy.

Pingames - D. Haynes

HI-DIVER: I'm sorry, but I'm going to confess a major sin.  Please have your children leave the room.

The Slot Shoppe - P. Olson

ICE COLD BEER: Collectible machine?  What makes a machine a collector's item?  Are any of the new machines going to become collectibles?  Well, your guess is as good as mine, but I sometimes take long shots.  I have an advantage n the fact that I own my own small arcade route.  Running equipment gives me one advantage that most collectors don't have.  I can buy a piece and play it, run it and then decide if I want to keep it, plus many items that I run are already collectibles in their own right.

Serial Number Updates - D. Bueschel

When last I wrote I was on my way to the Chicagoland Show in November out in Elgin, Illinois.  Well, I went.   I saw a lot of collectors there - maybe you, too - sold a lot of books (There's been a jump in sales.  Does that mean a bunch of new collectors?) and picked up a lot of great stuff.

5 Balls, 5 Cents - R. Jensen

Pinball Expo '87: Well, it happened again!  For the third year in a row we were treated to an all pinball show, the Pinball Expo.  When the first Expo was announced over three years ago, I thought, "what a great sounding idea, but how could I ever manage to make a trip to Chicago just for hobby purposes?"  Well, as luck would have it, I was given a cash award at work which was enough to finance the trip.  So I went and had a really good time!

Colorado Calling - R. Hector

Over the years I have purchased or recast parts or had them made myself, and have never been happy with the fit, so I thought that casting problems and solutions would be a good topic for this issue.  The whole problem stems from the fact that the new part, or recast, shrinks when it cools.  The shrinkage factor is 5/32 of an inch per foot of casting.  Thus, if you are doing a back door for a trade stimulator, the recast part may be 1/4 inch or more too small.  This article will discuss some of the tricks which are available to battle the dreaded shrinkage monster.

Coin Slot People - N. Rogell

This interview was conducted at the home and museum of Marvin Yagoda on April 24, 1987 by Nancy Rogell

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Charitable Gambling Law - R. Franklin

A study of Minnesota's largest charitable gambling operators found that veterans' and fraternal organizations contributed mainly to their own buildings and maintenance in1986.

Summer 1988 Vol. 4, No. 4

THE COVER

Goettlieb New Daily Races

 

 

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Bubble Gum Alley - Roger Smith

Let's begin this installment with some trivia:

  1. What gum company once used Ronald Reagan as its radio Pitchman?
  2. Who taught M&M how to put the "M" on its candies?
  3. What gumball vendor has remained virtually unchanged for almost 80 years?
  4. What gum company's charitable system annually produces over $2 million for local charities and service organizations, with 90% of its machines "working for charity"?

The answer to all of these questions is the Ford gum and Machine Company.

Pingames: Rocket Ship - D. Gottlieb Co. 1958 - David Haynes

It's a depressing time of the year.  Tax time.  Time to see how many bullets Sam wants you to buy for him.  Losing time.  My basketball team came in dead last.  We are all getting old.  Even pinball hunting has been slow.

From My Vantage Point - R. Harris

There are a number of things that have changed since we last wrote this column.  While we were at the Chicagoland Show in April, Don Rock from Omaha, Nebraska stopped to talk with us about the new interpretation of the Nebraska law concerning private ownership of slot machines.  He told us that the most recent interpretation of the law prohibited private ownership of any slot machine no matter what the age.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

A spur of the moment vacation this year is the basis fro this issue's article.   After a year and a half of no real vacation, my wife and I decided to leave the kids at home and head for Door County in Wisconsin and then work our way through the Wisconsin Dells area for several days.  Of course, included in the plan was a search of the area for some good coin-op finds.  My best friend in the business, Kevin Hammerbeck who owns Kilroy's in Minneapolis, Minnesota asked me to look for any old toys, in which he has a side interest.  So, armed with no kids, some money and a patient wife, I was on my way by June 7,1988.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

 

Let's talk about serial numbers a little.  What do they mean, and what's in them?  The idea is an old one, going back to industrialization.  Number everything you make and you'll see how far you've come; you'll b able to track down and date any product with problems, and servicing is simplified by bunching products in groups.  Best of all, a serial number dates a product, provided records are maintained.

Coin Slot Centerfold: New Daily Races - The Last of the Gottlieb Gambling Pinballs - Dan Kramer

Step right on up, son, and drop in a coin - the horses are ready to run!

5 Balls, 5 Cents - R. Jensen

Every once in a while I start thinking of my early association with pinball and remember little things, such as games I used to play and the environments in which they were located.  I have decided to share some of these "remembrances" with you to give you some insight into "where I came from" when it comes to pingames, at least as far as my child hood is concerned.

Coin Slot People

This interview was conducted at the home of Ken Rubin on August 30, 1987 by Cynthia L. Kerstiens.

 

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

From The Publisher - Donald R. Hoflin

This past summer has been a time of introspection to many of us - due to the high temperatures that have prevailed across the United States.  Here in Denver we have been experiencing weather that seems to be an uncomfortable 5 to 10 degrees warmer than normal.

Baby Sells - Bally Selling Arcade Assets to Competitor

Bally Manufacturing Corporation is getting out of the arcade machines business it created 57 years ago, selling pinball and video games business to concentrate on more lucrative ventures company official said.

The Deceitful Merchant - David A. Cosmo

I recently acquired a "Play Ball" amusement machine dating back to the 1930's, and maybe by the Exhibit Supply Company.  A good friend of mine, named Gary, was very curious about this machine.  Together we decided to examine the game more closely.

Slot Payoffs - Slots Can Hit Any Payoff Combination - Bill and Marge Hadley

How do slot machines in Las Vegas work?  Is winning a jackpot based strictly on the odds of a specific combination of symbols appearing on the paylines?  Are major jackpots figured in as part of the payback percentage?

Book Review: Owners Complete Guide to the Mills Q.T. Slot Machine - D. Bueschel

I strolled into the Bill and Rosanna Harris booth at the April Chicago Land Show just as a "customer" walked up, picked up the very first of the first copies of the Saul and Geddes book "Owners Complete Guide to the Mills Q.T. Slot Machine"

Hoflin Publishing Ltd. did a good job of production.  they could hardly miss, as Saul and Geddes provided them with good material.

In Memoriam: Obituary Edmund Charles Fey, Sr. 1896-1988 - Marshall Fey

Pioneer, inventor and operator of coin-operated machines, Edmund Charles Fey passed away on April 19, 1988 at the age of 92.  He had spent 50 years in the industry in which he, like his dad, was also a major contributor.

Las Vegas - Sin City?

Glasnost, the official Soviet Policy of openness, tolerates a lot these days, but could it tolerate Las Vegas?

Auction Review  - L.J. "Jim" Waters

WOW!  Its "Hot-Hot-Hot," as the piped in music glared at me from the ceiling of the Tropicana Casino. After a while, I thought I'd have to file a formal complaint with management that their theme music was driving me away from their casino.  But the sudden jackpot, lights flashing, and slot machine bell ringing soon made me forget the awful music.  But still, it really was "Hot-Hot-Hot," as the outside temperatures near 100 degree mark and the inside bidding reached peak levels on certain items.  The stage was set for another Victorian Casino Antiques Collectors Antique Auction, May 27-29, 1988, at the Tropicana Hotel and Country Club, Las Vegas, Nevada.

National Jukebox Month - Fred Norton

The Amusement and Music Operators Association has been busy planning activities for the first National Jukebox Month this November as well as the 100th anniversary of the jukebox in 1989.

1987 Bally Report - L.J. Waters

Pinball collectors will be especially anxious to receive a copy of the 1987 Annual Report of Bally Manufacturing Corporation.  the outside cover contains a color picture of a 1932 Bally "Ballyhoo" pinball, which sold for $17.50 each when marketed.  Also contained in the annual report is a brief history of the company, along with historical background on pinball and slots.

Fall

1988

Vol., No. 1

ON THE COVER

Mills DUPLEX - See cover story on page 40.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

From My Vantage Point - R. Harris

Never let it be said that miracles cease to happen.  We thought the 25-year law was big news for Colorado, but Florida came along and very quietly topped that!  As of October 1, 1988, the law in Florida allows legal private ownership of slot machines which are 20 years old or older.  What a giant step from pre-1941.  To date we don't know who to thank for this dramatic change.  The sponsor has remained essentially anonymous.  Be that as it may, we would like to express our thanks and that of all Florida collectors to the unsung hero.

5 Balls, 5 Cents: Bye-Bye Bally games The "End of an Era"  - Russ Jensen

A little over a week ago I happened to hear an announcement on a radio "financial report" which caught my attention when I heard the name "Bally."  The report said that Bally Corporation was getting out of the pinball and video game business after over 50 years!  The reporter said they were selling that part of their business to some outfit called "WMS Industries" which I was later to find out was a "holding company" for Williams Electronics, Bally's important competitor in the games field.

Fantastic Finds - Don Faulkner

Having been a slot collector for about five years, I've actually found myself wanting to upgrade my collection.  In adding machines, I must sell some to make room, so I've had business cards printed and have been running a small ad under antiques in a local shoppers' paper.  The response has been terrific.  I've sold many machines, bought a few, traded a few and have had requests for repair services.  The latter (repair service) was responsible for my last find.

Coin Slot's Centerfold: Mills DUPLEX - R. Guill, K. Womack

This rare beauty, the Mills DUPLEX floor wheel, 5˘ play, serial number 921, was recovered from a Wisconsin road house.  The extremely rough condition made it ready for termination; however Keith Womack and Richard Guill, both of Bakersfield, California, returned it to life through their meticulous eight-month restoration.

DK's Pinball Kaleidoscope: What I did Last Summer - Dan Kramer

What did you do this past summer?  Nice vacation, fix up the yard, read that fat novel, repair the car?  Yeah, I did all that stuff and still had time for the most important activity of all - sucking up some more pinballs!

Pingames: King of Diamonds, Gottlieb 1967 - David Haynes

It has been an interesting summer.  In late May, I attended "Pinathon '88," Walt and Jerry Schlender's pinball gathering.

Coin Slot People: Nic CostaI - Stuart Rogell

This interview was conducted at the home of Nic Costa on February 16, 1988 by Stuart Rogell.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Indianapolis Auction: Indianapolis Antique Show Draws Dealers from Many States - J. Kelly

Vehicle license plates told the story of just how far dealers would travel to show their offerings for the annual L-W Spring Antique Advertising and Collectors Carnival, March 25-27, at the Indianapolis, Indiana Fairgrounds.  Thirty different states were represented by dealers and many thousands from all over the Midwest came to view antiques for sale - and take some of them home.

Book Review: The "BOOK" is Here! - Dennis Dodel

Like proud parents, the worldwide pinball enthusiasts "family" is celebrating the arrivals of its newest "baby."  Fathered by author Dick Bueschel, it is named "Pinball 1 - Illustrated Historical Guide to Pinball Machines - Volume 1."  Conceived over eight years ago and nurtured along for the better part of a DECADE, Pinball 1 has finally arrived.

Opportunities Auctions Bob Burrell

On March 12th I attended the Opportunities Auction in Atlanta, Georgia.  Mr. Evans had over 50 jukeboxes including 600, 700, 750, 800, 850, 1100, 1015, 1050, etc.  Many were restored and many were unrestored.  Over 40 slots were sold including two nice floor machines - JUDGE and CRICKET - which were sold for $5,700 and $11,00.

Nostalgia Bubbler: Rowe's New Nostalgia Bubbler Captures Look of Golden Age of Jukebox

Whippany, New Jersey - Rowe International Inc. has announced the introduction of its newest nostalgia jukebox, the NOSTALGIA BUBBLER RB-8.  It is available from Rowe's nationwide network of local music operators.

Winter

1988-1989

Vol. 5, No. 2

ON THE COVER

Daval GUM VENDOR.  See "Letters," page 14, for more information.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Bubble Gum Alley - R.P. Smith

In this installment, we turn our attention to an indispensible resource for the collectors - books.  While publications such as Coin Slot are invaluable for keeping the collector up to date, books provide a compact repository for background information.  Books can deal with topics in greater depth and breadth than can fit in the confines of a magazine format.  For those who are not already familiar with them, there are two new books that warrant the attention of coin-op collectors.  This is "Automatic Pleasures," just published by Nic Costa.  The second book has been out for about a year and is titled "Silent Salesman," authored by Bill Enes.

DK's Pinball Kaleidoscope: The Index to Coin Slot Pinball Articles 1981 to Present - Dan Kramer

I'm basking in the afterglow of Pinball Expo '88, fellow pinatics!  This can last for months following such a heady event.  So many new and old contacts, leads and ideas blossom forth that I can't possibly follow up on them all.  My apologies to anyone who doesn't hear from me.  The thoughts of pinball energy survive nonetheless, so just give me a gentle reminder if you were forgotten and wish a response.

Notes From Frisco: The (Not So) Fantastic Find - D. Faulkner

This story began about three years ago when I was really a novice collector of slot machines.  A business neighbor of mine is in the wholesale antique business.  She is British and travels to England monthly on buying trips.  I had purchased many things from her over a period of time.  One day I mentioned that I was a collector of antique slots.  Emily, my English friend, said "Oh! I can get lots of those and quite cheaply."  Since I had read somewhere that a "TRUE" collector avoids the export English machines, I thought, what the heck, let's see what she can find.

5 Ball, 5 Cents: Pingames at the 1988 Fun Fair - A Variety  - Russ Jensen

The tenth edition of the Loose Change Fun Fair was again held at the Pasadena Exhibit Center in Pasadena, California, the weekend of the first and second of October.  There was a large number of visitors as well as exhibitors, the exhibit area even extending into the seating area for the snack bar.

Serial Number Update - D. Bueschel

Thank you folks.  My mail has bulged with photos and serial numbers in the past three month, and it's as if we've got a new rebirth of serials and interest.  Then there's Ed Zimmerman, who is putting all of the serials into his computer to make a total updated list (and it's turning out to be far more work than Ed had imagined).  I'm working on a slots book, too, with all the Jennings machines illustrated, described and with manuals.  The slot flame is burning bright.

Pingames: JALOPY 8/1951 Williams Electronic, QUARTETTE 1/1952 D. Gottlieb Company - David Haynes

You will be reading this after Christmas, so I hope the season was good to you and your families.

It's wintertime.  Out here on the West Coast it doesn't snow much, so we don't have to shovel the stuff, just ski on it.  It doesn't get too cold either.  We play a lot of golf in the winter.  Californians are very spoiled...and crowded.

CS Centerfold: MULTIWIN - Paul Olson

It's English machine time!  You're strolling along through a quiet evening mist in an English hamlet.  You're on a roundabout path in a woods you've never walked about before.  As you round a bend of trees you see before you a typical English pub.  It has one of those nice English sounding names.  Maybe its the Knight's Rest Pub or the Queen's Inn or the Dismal Damsel - alright enough with the names.

Consider This: Detroit Area Auction Draw Serious Buyers - Jack Kelly

More than 400 mechanical antique collectors converged on the small town of Lapeer, Michigan on October 29, for an auction boasting "mechanical marvels and unusual antiques to charm you all."  The event was hosted by, and featured the collection of, auctioneer Gordon Riewe, who said he had been collecting for over 25 years.

Collector in the News: Pinball Wizard - Dan Kramer - C. Skipitares

We've started a new feature each issue, spotlighting collectors in the news.  If you've been written up in a magazine or newspaper, please write and tell us about it.  Send the write-up and original photos, when possible to The Coin Slot.

Coin Slot People: Paul Haskel - Nancy Rogell

This interview was conducted at the home of Paul Haskel on February 23, 1988 by Nancy Rogell.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Opportunities Auction - Bob Burrell

On October 15, 1988 I attended the Opportunities Auction by Preston Evans of Atlanta, Georgia.  Over 45 slot machines and over 85 jukeboxes were sold, as well as, advertising, trade stimulators and other coin-ops.

Spring

1990

Vol. 6, No. 3

ON THE COVER

Game Room, See Cover Story in "Coastline" by Don Faulkner, page 17.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Letters

Coastline - Don Faulkner

The Summer 1989 issue of Coin Slot contained an article by Walter Newton on Game Room Design.  I was happy to see it, but was disappointed by the lack of pictures.  I read the article several times and still don't know if the author decorated his own game room as described, or were these design concepts he wanted to pass on to others?  In any case I was happy to read his article, as there have not been many written on the subject.  I have been working on my game room for about four or five years, decorating it with things as I would acquire them.  Let me share my story with you.

Pingames - D. Haynes

Let's see, March or 1963... I had just quit a job with State Farm Insurance Company.  Less than a year out of high school, I had hired on  with the insurance giant for a CAREER.  After six months, I started to realize that they were running a sweatshop.

Collector of the Quarter -Scott Williamson

"The hunt is the fun part!" - But hunting for Jack Kelly of St. Joseph involves stalking elusive antiques, primarily cigar store and vending-amusement devices.  Plenty of the forays resemble the proverbial "snipe hunt," but occasionally he bags a trophy.

CS Centerfold - Tom Gustwiller

Puritan MAYFLOWER - In the machine business it was common practice for one manufacturer to copy  another if the machine was a success.  For example, Mills copied the Fey three reel machine for their cast-iron version.

Setting the Pace - L.J. "Jim" Waters

Dating your slot machine - perhaps the most difficult challenge a collector faces.  Those which seem hardest to date are the immediate pre-war and post-war models.

5 balls, 5 cents - Russ Jensen

Well, for the fifth year in a row the fabulous Pinball Expo was held in Chicago.  This time, prior to going to the show, two things happened.  The first was that by coincidence the dates of the Expo (September 29 and 30) and the weekend of California's coin machine show, the Loose Change Fun Fair, occurred on the same weekend!  I had to make a decision as to which show to attend, but since the Expo was "all pinball" and the Fund Fair wasn't, the Expo won out of course.

Fantastic Finds - R. Maslowski

I saw an advertisement in the local "Bargain News" which said "FOR SALE: 5 slot machines and 2 trade stimulators."  I quickly called the number to inquire what he had.  The fellow said, "I have a Mills HIGHTOP, a Mills EXTRAORDINARY, a DUTCH BOY/DUTCH GIRL, a Pace COMET and a WISECRACKER.  Knowing the first four to be rather common machines and never having heard of a WISECRACKER, I questioned him further.  He then stated that it was a FOK WISECRACKER.

Coin Slot People - Katie LeCour

This interview was conducted at the business of Stan Harris on December 7, 1989 by Katie LeCour.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Outlaw Ole - N. Troll

Friendships lost, no full-time job and an arcade business that was just paying the bills.  Yah, sure, this was just another normal day in Ole the Norvegian's life.  For poor Ole it was just another beautiful day in Minnesanowta.  Late June, sun shining bright, 70 plus degrees outside.  Yah, the birds were singing, the sky was blue, it was a shame to waste such a day on a heartbroken Norvegian like Ole. 

Toy Banks - R. Bueschel

He sits there, staring at you, and challenging you to drop a nickel in the coin slot.  It's a bank right? Wrong!  What bank would say "Pays Five For One."  Maybe some would now, and did perhaps 60 to 70 years ago.  But not 113 years ago.  The subtlety wasn't around in those days.  It's a gambling machine, plain and simple.  And better yet, it's the first coin-operated gambling machine ever made.  And it's American.

Summer

1990

Vol. 6, No. 4

ON THE COVER

The Norris "PENNY MASTER." See Centerfold story on page 36.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Ad Rates  & Deadlines

Letters

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

Famed author and playwright the late William Saroyan was apparently one of the first people in the literary arts to realize that pingames were definitely part of the American scene.  In 1939 he came out with a play "The Time Of Your Life," which was to win a Pulitzer Prize in 1940.  The story was set in a San Francisco waterfront saloon called "Nicks" and revolves around its various patrons, their problems, feelings, and aspirations.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

If anyone reads this column on a regular basis, they know that I usually don't write about slot machines.  When I decided to buy this machine, I first went to my pile of reference materials to check out its history.  Well, it seems that very little has been written about this poor little machine.  Now, in my opinion, this is not your standard, everyday, run-of-the-mill slot machine.  It's not really a full-size slot like a Pace COMET or Mills BLUE FRONT would be.  Then again, it's not a small slot like the Pace BANTAM or Mills Q.T.  This is more like a three-quarter-size slot, so it deserves some recognition.

Serial Number Update - Richard Bueschel

Okay, just how many shows was that, back-to-back?  Something in the East, ChicagoLand, the Fun Fair, back East, then out West.  I guess we can handle that, but it was a race for a lot of dealers and the not and heavy collectors.  It was also a pileup of good serials, added interest and an idea by Alan Sax.

Fantastic Finds - Rick Akers

Most of the time, finding slot machines requires a lot of work.  It's not very often they fall into your lap.  This is how I came across one of my favorite machines.

CS Centerfold - Roger Hilden

The Norris "PENNY MASTER" - The cover photograph for this issue is a close-up of a Norris Manufacturing Company "PENNY MASTER" gumball machine.  The Norris Manufacturing Company was located in Columbus Ohio (no longer in business).  The "MASTER" carries a patent date of August 14, 1923. (some carry a second date of October 7, 1924), and were made from 1923 to 1929. Even though they were only made for six years, there were thousands produced and that is one of the reasons they have survived over the years.  It is one of the only real antique gumball machines that can be easily acquired for your coin-operated machine collection.

Pingames - David Haynes

I attended Pinathon Three last weekend, Walt and Jerry Schlenker's annual gathering.  This year, Don Wright joined Walt and Jerry in putting the bash on.  Don, who was my playing partner during the first Pinathon, is a really great guy; a fine gentleman and a very good player.

Coin Slot People - Laura Castle

This interview was conducted at the home of Steve Young on January 18, 1990 by Laura Castle.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Pinball STAMPEDE - J. Atkins

Let me add a few comments on Rockola's 1935 pinball, STAMPEDE, to your discussion in the Spring issue of Coin Slot.  You mentioned that the game did not appear to be successful and was later reduced in price by the company.  There were probably two main reasons for this lack of popularity.

From My Vantage Point - R. Harris

1989 brought the electro-mechanical age of slot machines to 25-year states.  I also brought some confusion with it.  In Washington state, for instance, the gaming commission requires that the particular machine purchased must have left the Bally factory at least 25 years ago to the date.  They will not accept the beginning manufacturing date as the age of the machine.

Manitou Arcade -  P. Emmert

Nickels and dimes to have a good time!  That is all it takes in the Old Room at the Manitou Arcade, where there are many classic pinball, baseball and arcade games available to play.  Other areas offer solid state and video games, but nothing beats the Old Room!

Superior Story - Phil Frey

In Dick Bueschel's "An Illustrated Guide to 100 Most Collectible Slot Machines," Volume Four, one of the pages dedicated to Superior machines begins with the comment, "What we have here is the continuation of a story with more facts to fill in the holes.  But not all of them, sad to say, for the Superior Confection Company Machines are still somewhat of a mystery to most collectors."  This volume did indeed clarify a few points about the intriguing Superior Confection line.  However, even more questions were raised.  A key is found further along in the aforementioned review, where Michael Connolly comments, "As a group... the Superior machines are the most fascinating of any manufacturer, due to their infinite variety and amazing engineering." Where the search for machine manuals or for any detailed reference information has yielded little success to date, the best hope for developing a portrait of the engineering, and thus, identify, of the Superior Confection Company rest with the clues found within the surviving machines themselves.

Fall

1990

Vol. 7, No. 1

ON THE COVER

Yankee Vendor - See Jack Kelly's story on page 22.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Letters

5 Balls, 5 Cents - R. Jensen

When I became re-interested in pinball in the early 1970's (I had almost forgotten about pins since I was a kid), I decided to check and see if there were possibly any books on the subject, other then the Bally booklet "Coin Operated Amusement," which I had already obtained.  A search through the library card catalog, however, revealed that there apparently had never been any books written on that subject any time from the inception of the game in the early 1930's up through the early 1970's.

Pingames - David Haynes

This quarter, I'm going to burden you with some pinball politics.

Serial Number Update - Richard Bueschel

Have you noticed a resurgence of interest in vintage coin-ops?  I certainly have.  You may remember that in last issue's "Serial Number Update" I mentioned a large serial number list that was received from Bill Whelan in Daly City, California, plus a list from Orin Yeager.  Well, I got more, starting with a massive list from Ron Pusateri, who certainly took a lot of time to create a detailed list of the machines he has or has seen.  All in all, we have a substantial inventory of lists to work from for the next issue or two, missing only those "onesy-twosy" lists and photos that add the interesting variations to the game of this feature.

CS Centerfold - Nobby's Salted Peanuts

We tend to think of the United States as the leader in coin-operated machines.  Anyone who has read "Automatic Pleasures" by Nic Costa, can tell you that even though the U.S. has had a tremendous love affair with the coin-operated machine, we do not have a monopoly.  Feelings for these fixtures of daily life have no international boundaries.  In this installment, I bring you a look at a very special vendor from "down under."

Coin Slot People - Katie LeCour

This interview has conducted at teh home of Butch Torpey on April 6, 1990 by Katie LeCour

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Recycling Bell Locks - R. Frankenberger PhD

Many collectors, I suppose, in buying or trading for machines have found included in the deal a large box of parts.  Not being a parts person, I have always seen the various clocks, slides, springs, fingers, and that big cigar box full of locks and keys as so much ballast.   One time I went through every lock and key in my cigar boxes to see if any would match.  No luck.

Game-A-Rama

Three major companies with national and international presences have pooled their considerable resources and marketing savvy to create a sweepstakes to be held from July 23 through September 30.  "Kids" of all ages will be eligible to win the latest, full-size video and pinball arcade games from Williams Electronics Games, Inc. and Bally/Midway in a promotion to be held in the hundreds of Bresler's Ice Cream and Yogurt Shops from coast to coast.

Yankee Vendor - Jack Kelly

The front cover of this quarter's The Coin Slot features a cast iron device with an unusual history - and a name many coin-op collectors will instantly recognize - the name is Northwestern, the company that builds many collectible gum and peanut machines.

Voting for the Top Ten! - Richard Bueschel

Did anyone read between the lines last time?  An idea advanced by Alan Sax was dropped in the "Serial Number Update" in the last issue, and yet I didn't get a single answer.  I have heard that quite a number  of readers are discussing the idea, but no one has dropped me a line on the subject.

The One that Got Away - Jimmie Crowell

My wife and I own a dance studio in Oklahoma City, one of the oldest, and for a hobby we like to tinker with old slot machines.  I make them work and she paints them to look as the factory intended.

Summer Vacation - W. Kirkwood

This summer I took a trip back in time.  Not by intent, but I was there nonetheless - even if only in my mind.  My wife and I took a vacation with our young son along the seacoast of Maine.  After we had traveled out of Massachusetts on Route 95, we headed up the old U.S. Route 1 into Maine.  We made the mistake of going through the tourist trap of Kittery, but as we traveled farther up Route 1, Maine began to look like Maine should, with the typical quaint New England towns.  As we travelled along, and while our 17 month old son slept, I began to tell my wife how my old surfing buddies and I traveled this same route almost every day during the summer of 1966.  On the spur of the moment, I took the hard right off Route 1, and onto Route 1A, and up along the coast.

Restorations - G. Folsom

From basket case to better-than-new condition, here is the story of how we restore slot machines in Denver.  This article will go through the complete restoration of one machine without becoming technical.

Vending Venues

A recent poll reveals vending machines are found nearly everywhere, from cemeteries to cornfields, dumps to dentist offices.

Jukebox Hall of Fame - Bill Johnson

A little bit of Americana is tucked into a stone building on Oklahoma City's south side. It's a bubbling, flashing, throbbing display of the machines that helped mold the country's musical tastes for more than half a century.

Slot Player vs. Manufacture/Operator -  R. Frankenberger PhD

Whenever man invents a machine, game or system designed to separate a man from his money, whether it is cards, horses or a pea under a walnut shell, some other man will find a way to beat the system.  Slot machines are no exception.   I suppose when the first slot machines appeared in large numbers, players discovered ways to get an edge.  As soon as this discovery became apparent to the manufacturers, they in turn secured the machine against the technique.  This tug of war by both the manufacturer/operator and players seesawed back and forth for 30 years.

Pay Slide Adjustment - J. Reely

Since all parts must be in harmony to operate, it would be difficult to classify the most important part of a slot machine.  However, since the primary objective in playing is to extract a "payoff," the pay slides would get my vote as the "heart" of the machine.

Winter

1990-1991

Vol. 7, No. 2

ON THE COVER

French Mickey Mouse Roulette.  See CS Centerfold on Page 40.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Ads Rates & Deadlines

Letters

Pingames: Backglass Art of Roy Parker - David Haynes

Late November.  It is starting to get cold out here in California...finally.

 

To put this into perspective for all of you freezing, East coast folks, I am still pulling ripe tomatoes and peppers from my garden.  We also had the first winter rain.  It was a light, .35 incher.  If we don't get a large amount of rain this year, the Golden State is going to dry up and blow away.

5 Balls, 5 Cents - R. Jensen

For the twelfth year in a row, coin machine enthusiasts in southern California, and any others who wanted to travel to Pasadena, were treated to the "Loose Change Fun Fair."  As it has been, except for the very first year, the show was held in Pasadena Exhibit Center in that city.

Show Review: Antique Advertising, Slot Machine and Jukebox Show - L.J. "Jim" Waters

When The Coin Slot asked me to write something about the fall, 1990 CHICAGOLAND show, my immediate thought was "What can I say or write which hasn't already been written?"  But, its easy to write about something you like.  I like the CHICAGOLAND shows.

CS Centerfold - French Mickey Mouse Roulette - Robert Preiffer

To my knowledge, none of the articles devoted to the famous mouse of Walt Disney mention his use on at least two French slot machines: BUSSOZ and SPANAGER.

Serial Number Update - Richard M. Bueschel

We have a theme of sorts this time over the course, and it's restoration.  I'd better define my terms.  Restoration means exactly that: restore.  Make something what it once was.  And no more.  For instance, if you took a neat-looking Watling ROL-A-TOP and brass plated the top and front castings to enhance the golden top, you didn't restore the machine.

Coin Slot People - Katie LeCour

This interview was conducted at the home of Alan Sax on September 7, 1990 by Katie LeCour.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Bell Slot Machines: The Ten Most Collectible Automatic Payout Bell Slot Machines - Richard M. Bueschel

Alan Sax started it all, and it took two issues for things to warm up.  But then, things got hot.  The Top Ten List Lives!  For a while, I thought nothing would happen here, in spite of all the verbal comments I heard about the list at the two Chicagoland Shows in 1990.  So, where was the mail?

Carney Auction - Preston Evans

John Carney, one of the most avid and well-known collectors in the Southeast, is selling his entire estate on April 13, 1991 at his home in Marietta, Georgia.  Many fellow collectors have called on Mr. Carney all through the years asking for advice or information on various machines.  He was collecting coin-ops before collecting was cool.

"Daddy Dave" is Gone - R. M. Bueschel

A lot of the younger collectors didn't know "Daddy Dave," whereas just about all of the "older" collectors of any age that were in the hobby of vintage coin machines since the 1970's know him well, and even bought their first upgraded reels from him.  And now he's gone.

Superior Story: Part Two - Phil Frey

The Superior Special Mystery is indeed a "mystery" to many collectors, as are many of the Superior Confection line of machines.  The machine actually went by another name during its mid to latter 1930's run, though the Special Mystery front plate was initially the only model indentifying hint.  The streamlined styling presented an exterior that was difficult to visually date, and these machines were originally painted typically in drab brown with the characteristic Superior yellow restricted to trim.  The payouts are an odd 3-5-10-15-20 (cherries through bells), and the jackpot (alternate left and right) is dropped on any combination of bars and Gold Award symbols (more on this unique feature later).  The top casting is the tip-off that this is a Superior machine - the escalator and the word

Spring

1991

Vol. 7, No.3

THE COVER

Wurlitzer Model 700

 

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Bubble Gum Alley - Roger Smith

Anyone who has collected coin-operated devices for any length of time is familiar with the second largest producer of slot machines, the Caille Brothers Company of Detroit.  While few collectors realize it, Caille did offer at least three globe style vendors over the years, and like their other machines, they were incredible.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Let me tell you true.  When I started the Serial Number Update in the old small size The Coin Slot about a dozen years ago, running about two dozen serial an issue, I thought we were going to run out of these things in a few years, maybe five or six.

CS Centerfold - Mills Reliable

My Mills Reliable just came back from the restorer (Tim Mosher) and I had to share this great machine with you.

5 Balls, 5 Cents - R. Jensen

Well, for the sixth year in a row I had the pleasure of attending the ultimate in pinball shows, Pinball Expo '90.  The show was held on November 9 and 10, 1990, and this was the third year that it was held at the Ramada Hotel, near O'Hare Airport in Rosemount Illinois.

Coin Slot People - Red Meade

This interview was conducted at the business of Red Meade in October of 1990 by Cynthia L. Kerstiens.

 

 

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Superior Story - Phil Frey

The Superior Mint Vender series of machines have been reviewed in Dick Bueschel's 100 Collectible Slot Machines Guide with the four column mint vender in Volume 3 and the jackpot version in Volume 4.

Slot Machine History - Tom Michel and Dick Gilbert

One of the first machines I acquired as a Mills Bonus Hightop.  The fellow I bought it from told me it was one of four Hightops originally housed in the legislative lounge at the Colorado State Capital.

Bell Slot Machines - Dick Bueschel

After we got off to an auspicious start things fell off on the "Top 10" with only one letter on the subject since the last issue.  But it's a beaut, and makes some fine points about collectability and - above all - the allowance to display.

Coin Machine History  - Dick Bueschel

A great writer once said "If you want to learn a lot about a subject, write a book about it."  It's true.  And it is also one of the reasons I write coin machine (and now other) history books.

Summer

1991

Vol. 7, No. 4

ON THE COVER

Jennings Rockaway.  Collector: Don Faulkner, San Francisco, CA., Photo by Herb Greene.

 

 

 

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Letters

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Vintage coin machine collectors are the worst people to try and spot a trend.  We always want things to get better and go our way.  But am I nuts?  Are things on the upswing?  Is interest (and the collector base) growing?  I feel it.  In fact, I see it.  Every Memorial Day weekend my wife and I take a four day trip to "somewhere".

Pingames - David Haynes

A lot can happen in four months.  Since December, when I was bragging about how my garden was still producing vegetables, California has gone through the coldest winter spell in history.  Two weeks of "teens" wiped out my garden, my orange tree, my lemon tree and most of the plants... I have never seen an example of Crosstown.  All of the animated backglass games are interesting to me.

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

Next up on the Expo program was The Coin Slot's Dick Bueschel with another interesting talk dubbed "Is Pinball Old at 60?"  Dick began by describing today's senior citizens and their various "youthful" activities.

Coin Slot People - Ken Taylor

This interview was conducted at the office of Ken Taylor in March of 1990 by Katie LeCour.

Collector of the Quarter - Scott Barrington

Hi.  My name is Scott Barrington, I'm 36 years old,  I've been collecting coin ops now for weight years and I live in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada which is a four-hour drive northeast of Syracuse, New York.

Collectors Directory

An Alphabetical listing of coin op collectors across the country, with their interest and specialties.

 

 

 

 

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Campaign to Stop Youth Smoking

The Amusement and Music Operators Association Introduces Campaign to Stop Youth Smoking.  The Amusement and Music Operators Association (AMOA), in response to growing concern over the issue of youth smoking, began a nationwide campaign in March of 1991 to strengthen its efforts to prevent minors from purchasing cigarettes from vending machines.

Twins? No. Distant Cousins - Maybe - Tom Michael

Back in May 1990, I spied an ad for an estate auction that included a "Pace COMET" so I went to the preview to have a look.  What I found was something I never seen, nor read about, before.

Slot Machine History, Part II - Tom Michel with Dick Bueschel

The Denver Post articles covered nearly a year's time span in the first installment.  Here, as the temperature heats up, stories appeared within a matter weeks.  Shenanigans - legal and otherwise - abound.

Fall

1991

Vol. 8, No.4

ON THE COVER

A sampling of vending machine and trade stimulator labels

 

 

 

 

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Letters

Bubble Gum Alley - R.P. Smith

During an area that prized the little things that set one "above the rest," the use of breath pellets to "cleanse the breath" was valued.  Sale of these social necessities was a service that showed a merchant cared for his patrons.  Breath pellets were sold from the counter tops of the best stores.  There were also found in the worst saloons, to discreetly cover the evidence of an evening's dalliance.  For collectors, breath pellet vendors represent a fascinating side of the hobby and an ideal area for the collector with limited space.  these miniature counter-top wonders have all the style and ingenuity of their larger peanut and gumball brothers, but in smaller packages.

The Slot Shoppe - Paul Olson

Although a first glance at Par Golf would have you believe its a pinball it is not.  It actually floats into the old pitch and bat style baseball game like Williams and United use to make.  So not rally a pinball but more of an arcade game.

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

A while back I presented an article titled "Pinball Literature," which described several magazine articles with both "pro" and "anti" pinball sentiments.  At that time  promised at a later date to describe some more articles on pinball, with a more of a "neutral" or "historical" theme, and also to briefly describe the pinball related books which began coming out in the mid to late 1970's

Coin Slot People - Jon Gresham, Dick Bueschel, Clive Baker

This interview was conducted in Geneva, Illinois on November 17, 1990.  Jon Gresham, of the Penny Arcadia, in York England; Dick Bueschel of Mt. Prospect, Illinois, Tthe Coin Slot's historical editor; and Clive Baker, a British arcade operator running vintage coin machines, met to discuss the day's events at the ChicagoLand Show, and to talk abut vintage coin machines.

Collectors Directory

An Alphabetical listing of coin op collectors across the country, with their interest and specialties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Superior Story - Phil Frey

Superior Confection Company (Part four) - Previous articles have discussed the primary Superior slot machine families including the Golden Bell, Gooseneck and Mystery models.  This installment will discuss an early Superior slot example and will expand on the sparse information available on Gustave W. Snyder.

Updating Antique Hunting - Jack Kelly

Michigan Firm Puts Antique Hunting Into High Tech Mode  - Should a Michigan electronics expert have his way, your next shopping trips for antiques (including coin-op machines) will start and end at the terminal of your personal computer.

Top Ten Results - Dick Bueschel

The Ten Most Collectible Automatic Payout Bell Slots - We sort of missed an issue for the Top 10 - no mail - but then a letter right on the mark came through form Paul Olson of Olson's Slot Shop in Sartell, Minnesota. 

Arrington Coin-Op Auction - L.J. "Jim" Waters

It will be hard to top it.  Roy Arrington's Victorian Casino Antiques' yearly auctions, which feature mainly coin-op machines, have gained a reputation for selling many unique and unusual items.  The fifteenth annual sale was no exception.

Opportunities Auction and Show - Bob Burrell

On October 5th and 6th, 1990, I attended Opportunities Auction and Show in Conyers (Atlanta) Georgia.

Retired Woman Hit Quartermania Jackpot - International Game Technology

A 72-year-old retired woman from Lemmon Valley, Nevada, hit the third major Quartermania slot jackpot for a total of $284,558.89 on March 20, 1989 at the Plantation Casino in Sparks, NV.

Dixieland Extravaganza - Chip Nofal

Jacksonville, Florida will be the site of the First Annual Dixieland Extravaganza Collectible Show and Sale set for February 8 and 9, 1992.

Winter 1991 Vol. 8, No. 2

ON THE COVER

Daval Gum Vendor - submitted by Don Faulkner

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

Ever since 1981 (with one exception - 1983, I believe) I have been reporting on the Annual "Loose Change Fun Fair" around this time.  Since the show's inception in 1979, it has been an annual event each fall; up until 1990 when they added an additional spring show.  I was unable to attend the spring show, but in 1991 I did attend the spring as well as the fall Fun Fair.

 

 

 

 

Review of 3 shows - The Spring 1991 Fun Fair, The Arizona Pinball Show and The Fall 1991 Fun Fair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Serial Number Update -Dick Bueschel

 

 

There's a clean on, and there's a dirty one.  But whatever one your remember, I am reminded of Custer's last words, which were (in one version): "Did you ever see so many (damn) Indians?"

 

I'll paraphrase:  "Did you ever see so damn many shows?" or, for that matter, "Did you ever see so many vintage coin-op magazines?"  We seem to be in an era of proliferation, with shows monthly across the country.  And magazines, well, I guess quarterly (or at least moving in that direction) across the country.  We all seem to have been discovered.  And that's good.  A word of caution; there's only so much room.

Coin Slot People - Rick Hector

This interview was conducted at the home of Rick Hector in January 1991 by Cynthia Kerstiens

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Book Review - Marshall Fey

Bally Owner's Pictorial Guide for Electro-Mechanical Slots by Robert Geddes/Dan Mead

Eleventh Annual Opportunities Auction- Bob Burrell

On November 8 and 9, I attended the eleventh Opportunities Auction in Conyers (Atlanta), Georgia.  This auction was put on by Mr. Preston Evans of Conyers, Georgia.  As usual, Mr. Evans had hundreds of coin-ops, music boxes, advertising items and other unique pieces.

German Coin-Op Auction - Jim Sheideman

 

An auction of antique coin operated machines from 1890 to 1960 was held in October 1991 in Flonheim, a small quiet village in the heart of German wine country, not far from the Rhine river.

ChicagoLand Pictorial

The following pages feature various pictures taken at the 1991 ChicagoLand Show, held in November 1991.

Spring

1992

Vol. 8, No. 3

ON THE COVER

Mills Counter O.K. Vender from the collection of David Close, Inver Grover Minnesota.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Letters

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

For the seventh year in a row, the world's greatest all pinball show occurred in the Chicago suburb of Rosemont, Illinois on October 25, 26, and 27.  The site again was the Ramada O'Hare hotel with its nearby reasonably priced diner, Snack Time, where many of the pinball fans go to eat at all hours of the day and night (there was even one time at 3 a.m. when three of us could not get a seat together even at the counter!).  By the way, this was the first year that the show officially lasted three days, ending at 4 p.m. on Sunday.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

This edition of the Serial Number Update should be called the "Triple Whammy."  Careful readers of The Coin Slot have probably already guessed why.  But there are some other surprises in store too.  The Why?  I'll explain.  For one reason or another, the Fall 1991 The Coin Slot did not carry a Serial Number Update.  Nope, it wasn't an omission.  We just had a lot of good copy and there wasn't room.

Coin Slot People: Rick Crandall - Debbi Sencenbaugh

This interview was conducted at the home of Rick Crandall in November 0f 1991 by Debbi Sencenbaugh.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Orin H. Yeager Memorial

Orin H. Yeager was born on February 27, 1917 in Midvale Idaho.  As a tender young child, in 1933, Orin joined his father in Onterio, Oregon, where he started to service slot machines.  From that time forward, they became part of his life.

Book Reviews - Russ Jensen

Pinball - An Illustrated History: The earliest, and hence the first of all pinball books, was published in 1976 by New American Library, was titled Pinball - An Illustrated History,  written by Canadian Michael Colmer.  I can still remember the thrill of hearing of this book and how excited I was to get a copy.  Of all the pinball books published, this was the first and exciting for that reason alone.

Pinball Portfolio: The next of the pin books to come out was also published in 1976.  It was titled Pinball Portfolio, was published by Chartwell Books and written by Englishman Harry McKeown.  This was a large format book, which was beautifully done, and had in its "Classic Machines" section some fantastic full page color photographs of play fields and back glasses.

Pinball: The third pinball book to appear in the 1970's was Pinball by Roger Sharpe, which was published by E.P. Dutton in 1977.  I had become acquainted with the author about a year before the book's release, first by telephone and later in person.  Roger was then, and still is, one of the truly dedicated pinball aficiaonados.

All About Pinball: The next book to come out was titled All About Pinball and was published by Grosset and Dunlap in 1977.  The authors were Steve Kirk and Bobyee Clair Natkin.  Steve, a pinball enthusiast since childhood, is presently employed as a design executive with current pinball manufacturer Premier Technology.  Ms. Natkin, his collaborator on the book, was a free-lance writer.

Tilt: The fifth book book to be released in the 1970's was simply titled Tilt, written by Jim and Candace Tolbert, and published by Creative Arts Books in 1978.  On a personal note - if it hadn't been for this book's authors you probably would be reading this article since Candace was the person who first asked me to try writing for publication, my first articles appearing in the Tolbert's short-lived publication Amusement Review in 1978.

Special When Lit: The final pinball book to be released in the 1970's, and the last for many years to come, was Special When Lit by Canadian Ed Trapunski, published by Dolphin Books in 1979.  I had the pleasure of meeting the author when he visited my home during preparation for the book.  Ed was a thoroughly enjoyable fellow with a real dedication to pingames.

 Summer

1992

Vol. 8, No. 4

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates and Deadlines

5 Balls, 5 Cents  - Russ Jensen

One of the first pinball articles I ever wrote (actually my fourth) was published in June 1979 in a small publication called Amusement Review.  The article was titled "Pinball Dating."  The idea behind that article was to describe the changes in the pinball machine over the years to aid a person in determining the year of manufacture of a game he might see or have described to him.  That article was reprinted a little later in the February 1981 issue of The Coin Slot.

Serial Number Update - D. Bueschel

We have an interesting situation.  Are there fewer machines out there, or are we getting more response?  I pose the questions because the Serial Number Update mail has taken an interesting turn in the past six months.  We are getting fewer serial numbers, but we are also getting more photos.  We like the later, of course, as it shows all of us what machines are showing up or being exposed for the first time.  We are almost getting a photo for every two serial numbers now, whereas in the past we got a serial numbers twenty to one over photos.  Perhaps readers are willing to share more.

Bubble Gum Alley: When Chewing Gum Was "Good for You" - Roger Smith

Today, we take chewing gum for granted. This $2.25 billion a year industry is so much a part of our daily life that we hardly take notice.  It wasn't so long ago that chewing gum was an immoral corruption that was socially acceptable only for children, who clearly knew no better.  Even in the recent past, chewing gum was the favorite cinematic symbol of a "fallen woman," or represented the difference between a "stenographer" and a "secretary."

Coin Slot People: Richard Conger - Debbi Sencenbaugh

This interview was conducted at the home of Richard Conger in January 1992 by Debbi Sencenbaugh

Coin Slot People: Guido Del Signore - Judy Mears

This interview was conducted at the home of Guido Del Signore, "Del," in February of 1992 by Judy Mears.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Airbrush Painting for Slot Machines - Rick Hector

As the days of slot machine restoring go by, I am often reminded of the quality of work I did years ago, compared to now.  It strikes me that one of the reasons for higher quality restoration today is a learning curve.  That is, hopefully everyone learns with experience.  A second factor is improved technology and materials.  An example of the second factor is the use of airbrushes along with improved automotive paints.

Delaware 25-Year Law - D. Johnson

The state of Delaware enacted a 25-year antique slot machine collection law in May, 1992 - House Bill No. 409.

Fall

1992

Vol. 9, No. 1

ON THE COVER

Canada card machine.  See cover story on page 22.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

There's a trend here.  I'm sure.  But we have more first timers fro the Serial Number Update this issue than we have had in years.  And that includes a lot of machines with emotional attachments.  Take Dan Maggitti of Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania, for instance.  His serial 479,05# Mills CHROME "Diamond Front" (he can't make out the last digit) is, in his words, "The first one I bought, back in 1988.  I blame this machine for the bad case of slot fever hat has been with me ever since."

5 Ball, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

A publication which many pinball collectors have been awaiting for quite some time was finally released in early June this year.  This little book titled "Pinball Collector's Resource," contains a virtual "treasure trove" of pinball information, and it is also a "gateway" into the largest pinball information computer database ever assembled.

Cover Story

As in most things, when the experts get together, they don't agree much.  So when the Letter column of the Summer '91 issue (see page 18, "Stick in Your Thumb and Pull Out a - Caille") of The Coin Slot carried a letter and some photos from Jack Kelly of St. Joseph, Michigan, and author Dick Bueschel  identified a LITTLE PERFECTION card roller as a Caille GOOD LUCK (based on a horseshoe casting on the front of the cabinet), the fur started to fly.  Tom Gustwiller, of Ottawa, Ohio, got in the most telling blows when he identified the machine as a Canda PERFECTION CARD machine made by the Leo Canda Company.

Coin Slot People: Oscar M. Schneider Jr. SLOT MACHINES OF TEXAS - Judy Mears

This interview was conducted at the home of Oscar M. Schneider Jr. and his wife Janet, March of 1992 by Judy Mears.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

First Annual Dixieland Extravaganza - Chip Nofal

The First Annual Dixieland Extravaganza Show and Sale was held in in Jacksonville Florida on February 7-9, 1992.  this show had a full house with 45 exhibitors representing fourteen states. The dealers display great collectibles with fill over 60 exhibition spaces.

From My Vantage Point - Rosanna Harris

There have been many venues of gaming, established recently, but most have little or no effect on enhancing the ownership of gaming devises for home use.  In fact, in some cases, it has come to a point of negating ownership.  In those cases, only the watchful eye of interested parties has kept the current laws in place.  In the original language of the bill in Colorado, home use machine would have become contraband at the time the bill was signed into law.  This would have been the case because of the necessity of all machines meeting specifications of gaming machines for the limited gaming  jurisdictions.  One can say, well, possibly the home use machines would have been scrutinized and then again, maybe they would not have been.  Clearly it's not a position one would look forward to with a collection in jeopardy.  When laws re changed in regard to gaming machines, there is need for someone to review the language and make sure the current home use legality is protected and/or changed to a more acceptable law.

States Having Legalized Antique Slot Machines

Phofolio - Bernie Madrid

The following photographs are from Bernie Madrid's collection, and we thought our readers would enjoy them.

Before and After - Tim McGovern

A pictorial renovation of a Mills MYSTERY GOLDEN VENDER from the collection of Tim McGovern, Scottsdale, Arizona.

Is There a Hobby in the House?  - Cynthia V. Campbell

Louisiana politicians are constantly on the go, and, perhaps more than most, need ways to relieve stress.  Some jog, work out or take up hobbies.  A few are collectors, but the collectibles they seek are not the ordinary things you find in the average upscale living room.

Memories for Sale - Mary Ellen Tarman

Back in the days when Hershey-park was two words and riding the carousel cost a nickel, the penny arcade was a favorite stop to spend some loose change and have a bit of fun.

The Golden Era - Richard A. Nelson

During the last several years, the world of coin-op collecting has witnessed the arrival of a new collectible, the 1940;s 78 RPM jukebox.  Oui magazine, on the cover if its January 1975 issue, had a nymph basking in the warm glow of a Wurlitzer 850 (of vice versa).  The authors of the jukebox articles in that issue proclaimed the 850 to be the king of all the old jukeboxes.  This national exposure among what some consider a hip and trendy audience was the final push needed to propel juke boxing into the big time.  The earlier revival of 50' music, plus Wurlitzer's nostalgia juke box and going-out-of business announcement, had previously begun a movement that snowballed  after the Oui article.

Finding, Buying, Selling - William E. Harris

So far, I've yet to see an article on how to find coin machines.  An advertisement in the Denver Post some weeks ago stated, "How to get rich buying and selling slot machines," or something to that effect.  My friend, Orin Yeager, sent for the pamphlet.  Later his money was returned with a note stating that there was not enough response to warrant sending out the advertised copy.  Apparently someone (blind ad) was hoping for a large enough response before printing and sending out his great secret.  The cost I might add was $3 a copy.

What They Looked Like  - Dick Bueschel

As collectors of slot machines, we tend to spend out time trying to track down the next gem, and then figure out what we've got.  In recent years this effort has gotten a little more sophisticated, with collectors and machine historians tying to learn more about where the machines came from, why, and how they were made and marketed.  This quickly pops us out of the machine class and into the study of people, and the businesses they served.

How Pinballs Work: A Primer on Magnet Coils and Solenoid Coils  - Steve Young

The motive forces in pinball machines are derived from electricity flowing through switches to energize magnet coils and solenoid coils.  These in turn do the mechanical work required to push the ball around the play field, advance scoring and scoring features, etc.  Replacing burned out or damaged coils and solenoids in old games often leads to frustration, confusion and improper or unsafe operation of the game.  This need not be the case.

Winter

1992-1993

Vol. 9, No. 2

ON THE COVER

Columbus Vendor penny bubble gum dispenser.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

5 Balls, 5 Cents: Three Shows - Russ Jensen

Like I did last year, I have again decided to report on three coin-op shows in one article.  The first show is the Spring 1992 edition of the "Collectors Fun Fair," and the second the annual Arizona "Pinball Show."  The third show I will report on, unlike last year, will not be the fall edition of the Fun Fair.  Instead, this year I will tell about a new coin-op show to come to California, the "Los Angeles Vintage Coin Machine and Advertising Show and Sale" put on by Bill and Roseanna Harris, past publishers of Coin Slot.

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

All of our photographs and comments come from one source this time around, and there's a story behind that.  The collector/dealer is Jim Coleman, PO Box 5087, Stateline, Nevada 89449, northern Nevada retail manager for AAncients Slots out of Reno.  Jim is a young collector, just in his twenties, who has become totally enamored with slots.  On his own time, and with his camera, he has endevored to take pictures of as many vintage slots that pass through the hands and shops of AAncient Slots before they are shopped and sold to customers.  And what a spot to be in.  Jim sits astride one of the most productive sources of antique machines, and it is truly amazing to see the variety and quality of machines that pass through his firm.

Coin Slot People: Bill Whelan - Debbi Sencenbaugh

This interview was conducted at the Grovenor Hotel in February of 1992 by Debbi Sencebaugh.

Bubble Gum Alley: The "Other" Inventor of Chewing Gum - Roger Smith

Ask anyone from around Louisville, Kentucky who the inventor of modern chewing gum was and you might get a surprising answer.  For folks in that area, the reply is not the expected one, Thomas Adams Sr., but is instead a man named John Colgan.  Who was this other inventor of chewing gum and why are the folks of Louisville convinced he should be given credit.  What is the real story behind the development of chicle gum?

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

This & That - Alvin J. Gottlieb

Alvin G. & Co. announces its first traditional pinball - "Al's Garage Band Goes on a World Tour."

Second Annual Great Northwest Antique Americana Show  - Vicki L. Strong

The second annual Great Northwest Antique Americana Show and Sale, held in the Seattle Center Flag Pavilion August 28-30, 1992, was a tremendous success.  Seattle's beautiful August weather, combined with the centrally located Seattle Center grounds, helped bring in the crowds.  There were lines of people waiting to gain admission on both Saturday and Sunday mornings.  Both dealer sales and attendance surpassed last year's figures.  Over 60 vendors from all over the United States and Canada filled 94 booths with great merchandise: a nice mix of slots, pinballs, jukebox, predictas, wallboxes, records, toys, advertising, etc.

Chicagoland Pictorial

Pictures on the following pages were taken at the November, 1992 Chicagoland Show.

Before and After - Tim McGovern

A pictorial renovation of a Gottlieb ALOHA pinball machine from the collection of Tim McGovern, Scottsdale, Arizona.

Spring 1993 Vol. 9, No. 3

COVER

Pace Races, from the collection of Tim A. Christensen.  See cover story on page 35.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Serial Number Update - Dick Bueschel

Wartime and immediate postwar revamps and upgraded machines seem to be the feature this pass, with a wide selection of machines by a wide diversity of collectors.  One thing about the Serial Number Update, you tend to see and learn about machine that aren't in any books, and may in fact never make it that far.  So let's hear it for a collector clearing house that share this knowledge and fascination with others.

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

For the eighth consecutive year 'the best of them all" - Pinball Expo '92 - was held in Chicago, again at the Ramada O'Hare.  This year, however, the show festivities started a little earlier, beginning with the annual pinball plant tour at 1 p.m. on Thursday, November 12.

Coin Slot People - Mary Jo Schroeder

This interview was conducted at the shop of Jeff Frahm and Tom Kolbrener in September of 1992 by Mary Jo Schroeder.

Collectors Directory

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

1993 Dixieland Extravaganza - Chip Nofal

The Second Annual Dixieland Extravaganza was held January 16 and 17, 1993 in Jacksonville, Florida.  Some 50 exhibitors from numerous states crowded the Morocco Auditorium Exhibit Hall.  On Saturday morning, the opening day of this two-day event, some 200 anxious spectators jammed the entrance to the Dixieland show.  This activity continued all day long with about 1600 people attending this show the first day.  One exhibitor said he was exhausted from the steady flow of traffic and never had time to take a lunch break.  Steve Foster, all exhibitor from east Tennessee, said he was very impressed with the turnout of people.  A wider variety of nostalgia and coin-ops appeared at this year's show.  There were various types of slot machines, music boxes, horn phonographs, ornate cigar cutters and advertising signs, just to name a few.  Many buyers were purchasing slot machines jukeboxes, trade stimulators, advertising and collectibles.  One exhibitor from Virginia sold seven of his eight beautifully restored jukeboxes the first day of the Dixieland show.  Sale were good for many exhibitors: a cast iron clam shell Mutoscope sold for $3000; restored Wurlitzer 850 jukebox sold for $19,000 ; Wurlitzer 1015 sold for $10,000; restored Buckley TRAC ODD - $400; Wurlitzer model 1080 - $9,000; Sunbeam advertising sign - $200; solar horoscope - $800; Columbus -A peanut machine-$300; Master Gumball-$200; Wurlitzer model 750 jukebox sold for $8500; Coke machine model 81 - 1350; Jennings STANDARD 10˘ - $1300; Regina 15 one-half inch music box sold for $4000 only to name a few.  Sales appeared to be quite good, and many of the dealers were pleased with the show.

Another tribute to Orin Yeager - Tim A. Christensen

Coin-op fascination started early for me.  My first memories were from the mid-1960s in Denver, Colorado, when ownership was still very questionable and I was less than ten years old.  My grandfather was given a near-new 25˘ Mills BONUS HIGH TOP when laws tightened around 1951 by a friend who ran some slots in his truck stops around Cheyenne, Wyoming.  Grandpa told me he could've had as many as he wanted, but he didn't dare take more than one.  He held it secreted away in his basement, where only us grandkids were allowed to play with it.  Early memories of this slot machine coincide with me overcoming my fear of trekking to the dark basement alone to "pull the handle."  After my grandfather's passing in 1984, my brother ended up with the HIGH TOP and still has it today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADVERTISERS

2: Atlanta Nostalgia how

15: Back Numbers

1: Chrome Plating

63: Classified Advertising

41: Denver Collectors' Fair

62: Evans and Frink

17: Game Stands by Ray Stuart

Outside Back Cover: Illinois Antique Slot Machine Company

40: Jennings Slot Machine

32: Pall

1: Roenigk

Inside Cover: Sax

Inside Back: Vintage Amusement Magazine

Fall 1994 Vol. 11, No. 2

COVER

Classic retouched factory photograph of the original animal reel 4 BELLS announcing the machine in October 1939 and used through December 1941.  All chutes are 5˘ where typically they were mixed nickel, dime and quarter.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

5 Balls, 5 cents - Russ Jensen

For the past couple of years about this time I have been doing an article called "Three shows" which covered The Loose Change Fun Fair, the Arizona Pinball show, and the Coin-op Super Show.  Well, this year it's a little different.

Let's Talk Vending - J. Carini

1950's Victor Baby Grand Vending Machine - An interesting wooden vending machine is the Baby Grand made by Victor Vending Corporation.  The machine came in different wood cabinet styles and can vend gum, peanuts, toys capsules or cards.

Coin Slot People - Stephanie Estreen

This interview was conducted in Burlington, New Jersey in June 1994 by Stephanie Estreen.

Collectors' Directory

Ad Rates & Deadlines

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Can You Insure Your Slot Machines? - R. Cloke and D. Evans

Dave: Over two years a good friend Bob Rosenberger asked if I had any insurance on my slot machine collection.  He noticed the growth in number of machines from his last visit.   I said, "No and I doubt if anyone would want to insure a bunch of old slot machines!"  Bob warned that with values increasing rapidly, that a normal homeowners policy would be woefully inadequate in a case of fire or theft.  Bob pointed out that not only would the loss be substantial, but the cost to replace the machine would be much greater than the acquisition costs of present machine.

1941 Peanut Machine -  J Carini

A couple of years ago, I noticed an ad in the Antique Trader, Bill Enes was selling 1941 Jay Walton Blount machines.

Odd Items Bring Bids At Auction - Ray Reed

MEADOWS OF DAN - It was just a warm-up day Saturday at the million-dollar auction of Shirley Mitchell 's collectibles, but a Brooklyn, N.Y., man paid $625 for a metal replica of a head with eyeballs that were supposed to move but didn't.

Watling Creates Name and New Machine - The Coin Machine Journal

When we made our regular visit this month to the plant of the Watling Manufacturing Company, we saw signs of an unusual rush for this season of the year for any manufacturer.  We thought here was the story.  The Watling plant is always busy but never was it busier.  So we asked ]ohn Watling, general manager and the man behind the guns to give us a story.

A Coming Collectible - Richard Bueschel

There was a time in slot machine collecting that a Mills DEWEY of 1898 and into the teens characterized a viable collection.  Meaning, if you had one you were a top-drawer kind of collector and were willing to spend a buck to prove it.  Thirty years ago, you could pick up a DEWEY for about $2,500, if you wanted it.  They went begging most of the time.  Twenty years ago, a DEWEY went for $6,500, inching its way up to $10,000 in the next decade, where it stayed.  It's still there with virtually no change in real value in the past ten years.

 

 

 

 

ADVERTISERS

Inside Front: Chrome Plating

50: Classified Advertising

Inside Back: Coin Slot Books

Inside Front: Roenigk

51: Trade 2

50: Vintage Slots of Colorado

Outside Back: Illinois Antique lot Machine Company

Spring

1995

Vol. 11, No. 4

COVER

Master Gumball Machine from the 1920's and 1930's.  Submitted by Tim McGovern

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

Well, believe it or not, 1994 was the 10th year of the fabulous PIN1BALL EXPO (the first show being put on in 1985.)  And, I'm happy to say, I have been lucky and privileged enough to attend all ten shows!

Coin Slot Centerfold - Jerry and Darryl  Fluegel

A 1937 Garden City Gem trade stimulator with cigarette pack reel strips is shown.  Although a rather plain styled machine, its large gumball display window gives it an attractive flash of color.

Coin Slot People - Jim Hobbs

'This interview was conducted at the home of Erick Johnson in February of 1995 by Jim Hobbs.

Collectors' Directory

Ad Rates and Deadlines

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

From the Editor - John Carini

Hi.  My name is John Carini and I am the new editor of Coin Slot Magazine.  You may already know me from my regular column, "Let's Talk Vending."  I've been a collector of antique vending machines since 1987.

 

 

ADVERTISERS

Inside Back: Chrome Plating

41: Classified Ads

41: Coin Slot Books

Outside Back: Illinois Antique lot Machine Company

Inside Back: Roenigk

Inside Front: Trade 2

Spring

1996

Vol. 12, No. 4

COVER

Slot machines from the collection of Mick Harris.  See Coin Slot People page 32.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

5 Balls, 5 Cent - Russ Jensen

Well, for the eleventh year in a row pinball fans from allover the country and other countries as well were treated to the "king of all pinball shows" - the Pinball Expo.  I have been lucky enough to attend all of the past shows, but this year for awhile I was unsure whether I could attend.

Coin Slot People - Ortrud Romer-Horn

This interview was conducted at the home of Mick Harris in March 1995 by Ortrud Romer-Horn.

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Collector Directory

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Orlando Nostalgia Memorabilia & Collectible Show - C. Nofal

Orlando Nostalgia & Collectible Show is the number one collector's show in Florida.  Commented a  South Fllorida attendee, "I will drive hundreds of mile to this show any time of year."  This enthusiasm was matched by many other visitors throughout the weekend of January 5-7, 1996.  Exhibitor and spectators were thoroughly excited by the vast display of great collectibles.  Jim May, a spectator from Florida, said, "It was a fantastic show and the crowd was excellent."

Collecting Coca-Cola Advertising - James Romeo

"Drinkin' Rum and Coca-Cola" blasted out of the 1945 bakelite General Electric table top radio.  It was wartime America with GIs, sailors and Coca- Cola everywhere.

Julia Sets World Records - James D. Julia

James D. Julia's spectacular sale of rare vending and coin-operated contraptions at the Best Western Homewood Hotel in Homewood, Illinois November 14-16 will long be remembered for bringing together top quality merchandise and serious bidders who came ready to seize a once-in-a-lifetime buying opportunity.  The quality and timing of this sale, which took place in conjunction with the semi-annual  Chicagoland Show, set two world records for the Julia firm.  In addition to rare vending and coin-op machines, the three-day sale included an outstanding selection of advertising memorabilia and mechanical music machines.  This auction extravaganza was, followed by a full day sale of toys on November 17, bringing the total gross for the four days of non-stop auctioneering to approximately $2.2 million.

St. Louis Auction - Gerald R. Sale

An auction of some highly collectible semi-antique slot machine and gaming devices took place in St. Louis at Selkirk's Galleries on November 9th.  These items were listed from the estate of a prominent St. Louis collector.  The auction house declined to identify the collector further.  Viewing of the items took place on November 7th.  Bidding by approximately 75 bidders was fast and furious on some items but the were some bargains to be had in the one-armed bandits that the majority of the collectors had come to bid on.  The floor model slots, trade stimulators and pinball machines appeared to be going at bargain rates.  The auction for the slots and other coin-operated items began at 11:00 and was all over by 12 noon.  Gaming items were interspersed with baseball collectibles, movie memorabilia, cash registers, reproduction Remingtons and a few oriental items  Also sold were an antique Edison cylinder phonograph with about twenty cylinders, a brass cash register and a seven cent coke machine.

ADVERTISERS

52: Back Numbers

23: Classic Shows

Outside Back: Illinois Antique Slot Machine Company

6,7: Pinball Fantasy '96

Inside Front: Roenigk

Inside Front: Speed & Sport Chrome Plating

Inside Back: Trade 2

Spring

1997

Vol. 13, No, 4

COVER

See Coin Slot People.

 

REGULAR FEATURES

Letters

Let's Talk VendingJohn Carini

A great vending machine, sought after by many collectors is the Climax.  I was lucky enough to be offered one at a "can't pass it by" price.  Last month, I received a call from fellow collector and friend, Jack, who lives on the East coast.  He told me he found the Climax machine at an antique shop, just lying on the floor.  Obviously, the owner didn't know what it was worth, because he was able to purchase it for a song.  The machine was missing the front mechanism and internal working parts.

Coin Slot People - Lindy Patrick

This interview was conducted at the home of Randy and Sue Razzoog in June of 1995 by Lindy Patrick.

Coin Slot People - Ken Goering

This interview was conducted at the home of Dave Jones in Cataula, Georgia in October of 1996 by Ken Goering.

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Collector's Directory

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

Pinball Expo '96 - Russ Jensen

Well, the Pinball Expo the - "king of the pinball show " - celebrated it's twelfth year in 1996!  The 1996 edition was held on November 14 through 17, 1996 at the Ramada O'Hare Hotel in Rosemont, Illinois.  The shows activities covered four days (Thursday through Sunday) with the first event being a tour of the Electrical Windings coil and transformer manufacturing plant on Thursday morning, but I decided to pass on that since I had toured that facility two years ago and to do it again this year would have meant flying to Chicago a day earlier and spending an extra night in the hotel at their high room rates!

Donating Your Collectibles to Charity - Jim Romeo

Five Way To Maximize Your Gifts of Art and Collectibles To Charity: One way to profit from your collectibles is to give them away!  Yes donating your collectibles to a charitable entity or religious, educational or other philanthropic organization can bring you significant benefit.  The rules however are complicated and you need to do your own research to insure that your specific circumstances are within the rules and regulations of the Internal Revenue Service.

 

 

ADVERTISERS

2: Back Numbers

6: Classified Advertising

Inside Back: Pinball Fantasy '97

Inside Front: Roenigk

Inside Front: Speed and Sport Chrome Plating

Outside Back: Zygmunt

Winter

1997-1998

Vol. 14, No. 3

COVER

See Coin Slot People

REGULAR FEATURES

Ad Rates & Deadlines

Letters

Let's Talk Vending - John Carini

The Freeport Dragons: Only a few weeks ago I came across a 1905 one-cent Freeport Dragons peanut machine - what a find!  And right in my own backyard!

5 Balls, 5 Cents - Russ Jensen

The Dresbach Pinball Thesis: This is the second time I have attempted to write a review of a University Master's Degree Thesis on the subject of pinball - and I am only aware of three thesis on that subject.  My previous review was of a thesis written by my good friend and fellow pinball historian Rob Hawkins back in 1976.  This time I will review the thesis titled "Art and Design  of Pinball Machines, Proposal for More Aesthetically Designed Machines,"  which was submitted by Chad Dresbach in May 1996 to Kent State University in Ohio for partial fulfillment of a Master of Arts Degree.

Coin Slot People - Connie Porter

This interview was conducted at the home of Walter Stidham in August of 1997 by Connie Porter.

Collector's Directory

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

The Fall 1997 Coin- Op Super Show - Russ Jensen

Last time while reporting on the Spring 1997 edition of the COIN-OP SUPERSHOW I commented that I might not be able to attend the Fall edition.  But luckily I was able to find a ride (with my son in fact) and was able to attend after all.

Fall '97 Chicagoland - John Carini

Antique Advertising Slot Machine and Jukebox Show: Friday, November 21, 8:15 am  - Car loaded past capacity with show materials and family.  Two screaming children, one nervous  dog and one crabby wife make for a grueling two hour drive.

ADVERTISERS

4: Back Numbers

Outside Back: The Illinois Slot Machine Company

36: Speed & Sport Chroming Plating

Inside Back: Classified Advertising

Winter

1998-1999

Vol. 15, No. 2

COVER

Previously unknown Chas. Fey & Co. cast iron trade stimulator found in a closet in northern California.  See story on page 2.

REGULAR FEATURES

Let's talk vending - John Carini

CUB Trade Stimulator.  Normally I don't collect trade stimulators because of the expense, but I wanted a small machine to sit on my new bar in my rec room.  In the winter of '97, I was at my fellow collector and friend's house - Paul Hinden.  Hw showed me some machines he had for sale.  One was a CUB stimulator.  It was perfect - just what I was looking for.

5 Balls, 5 cents - Russ Jensen

Pingames at the 1998 Coin-Op Super Show: This year there was only one edition of Bill and Roseanna Harris' COIN-OP SUPER SHOW.  It was held at the Pasadena Exhibit Center in Pasadena, California on October 3-4, 1998.  By the time of this show my good friend Ron Tyler (who drives me to these shows now that I can no longer drive) was finally back from an extended business trip (actually he is a college professor and was on a teaching assignment in Germany for almost a year) and could again accompany me to this fine show.

Coin slot people - Connie Porter

This interview was conducted at the home of Larry Brown in July of 1997 by Connie Porter

Ad rates & deadline

Collector's directory

 

SPECIAL FEATURES

The Chas. Fey & Co. RELIANCE IMPROVED - Ira Warren

These days I don't write articles, THIS TIME IS DIFFERENT.

Chicagoland, Fall '98 - John Carini

Antique Advertising, Slot Machine and Jukebox Show: Again it was time for the annual Chicagoland Show.  And this year was better then ever - I left my wife and kids at home!  I arrived at the show Friday at 9:00 am and checked in, set up my booth and was out checking out the deals in the parking lot by 10: am.

Juke Joints - Gert J. Almind

Paul M. Fuller, 1897-1951: Paul M. (Malt) Fuller was born in Switzerland on the 5th January, 1897, and immigrated as a young man to Wyoming in the United States, where he worked as a farmhand while he learned the English language.  Later he went to Chicago and worked for the firm Marshall Field & Company (today the fourth largest general merchandise retailer in the States).  At the Marshall Field & Company, Fuller soon became the chief designer in charge of interior decorating. 

ADVERTISERS

19: Back Numbers

Inside Back: Classified Advertising

20,21: Coin Slot Books

19: Speed & Sport Chrome Plating

Outside Back: Zygmunt & Associates

Spring

1999

Vol. 15, No. 3

COVER

1905 one cent FREEPORT DRAGONS. From the collection of John Carini, photo by Jim Larkin.

REGULAR FEATURES

Juke Joints - Gert Almind

With reference to The Coin Slot Spring 1998 issue, it would be right to show some more postcards on juke joints.  This time,  however, the jukeboxes should not be all Wurlitzers.  In one case, in fact, it is a rather nicely designed and rare conversion of the original Paul M. Fuller designed Wurlitzer 1015.

Let's talk vending - John Carini

Columbus MODEL 21 - As I was looking through photography of my collection I came across a photo of the Columbus MODEL 21 and decided it would be an interesting machine to write an article on.  I picked the machine up ten years ago from another collection/dealer "Mr. Condom."

5 ball, 5 cents - Russ Jensen

Pinball Expo '98:  Part 1 - For the fourteenth year in a row, the "King of the Pinball Shows," Pinball Expo '98, was held in the Chicago area.  As it has for all but the first three years, the show was held at the Ramada O'Hare Hotel in Rosemont, Illinois, October 22 through 25, 1998.  Like the past several years, I paid my expenses to attend the show mostly from money I have won playing bingo at our local Indian gaming casino (my other hobby).

Coin Slot People - Connie Parker

This interview was conducted at the home of Wade and Hazel Rollins in October of 1997 by Connie Parker.

ADVERTISERS

7: Back Numbers

Inside Back: Classified Advertising

36: Coin Slot Books

7: Speed  Sport Chrome Plating

Outside Back: Zygmunt & Associates